Thomas Wolstenholme

Last updated

Thomas Wolstenholme (April 6, 1870—November 16, 1952 [1] ) was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1922 to 1936. [2]

Wolstenholme was the 3rd child of Henry Wolstenholme (Born 1841) and Mary Leech (Born 1845). He had two older siblings, Henry & Emma. He also had a younger brother Alfred. His father was originally a Lithograph Machine Printer but later started a drapers at his residence 442 Oldham Road, where Thomas and his siblings helped in his business.

Wolstenholme was born and educated in Manchester, England, and came to Canada in 1889. Shortly after he moved to Canada, his father transmitted his business to his sister-in-law and Thomas's maternal aunt, who used to be Henry's assistant before he began a drapers, and her husband. Their family also helped at the drapers, her son being a commercial traveller as some of their other family members working there. He was a director and shareholder of the Moline Cooperative Society, and served as reeve of the Rural Municipality of Saskatchewan in Manitoba from 1918 to 1922. [1]

He first campaigned for the Manitoba legislature in the 1922 provincial election, as a candidate of the United Farmers of Manitoba (UFM) in Hamiota. He was successful, defeating Liberal incumbent John Henry McConnell [2] by 403 votes. The UFM unexpectedly won a majority of seats, and formed government as the Progressive Party. Wolstenholme served in the legislature as a backbench supporter of John Bracken's administration. He was re-elected without difficulty in the elections of 1927 and 1932. [2] He did not seek re-election in 1936.

Before the 1932 election, the governing Progressives formed an electoral alliance with the Manitoba Liberal Party. Government members, including Wolstenholme, were known as "Liberal-Progressives" after this time.

Wolstenholme was struck by a car on November 14, 1952, and died of his injuries at the Minnedosa General Hospital two days later. His death was ruled an accident. [1]

Wolstenholme's children include

Related Research Articles

John Bracken

John Bracken was an agronomist, the 11th and longest-serving Premier of Manitoba (1922–1943) and leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (1942–1948).

Douglas Lloyd Campbell

Douglas Lloyd Campbell was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served as the 13th Premier of Manitoba from 1948 to 1958. He was a member of the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba for 47 years, longer than anyone in the province's history.

Nicholas Volodymir (Val) Bachynsky was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1922 to 1958, and was Speaker of the Assembly for most of Douglas Campbell's administration.

Robert Henry Mooney was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1922 to 1953.

Nicholas Apoluner Hryhorczuk was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1920 to 1936, and again from 1941 to 1945. He was the first person of Ukrainian descent to serve as an MLA in Manitoba.

Arthur Rivers Boivin was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1917 to 1936, and again from 1941 to 1945.

Skuli Sigfusson was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba on three occasions: from 1915 to 1920, 1922 to 1936, and 1941 to 1945.

William Reid (Billy) Clubb was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1922 to 1941, and was a prominent cabinet minister in the government of John Bracken.

Isaac Bertie Griffiths was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1922 to 1941, and was a cabinet minister in the government of John Bracken.

Robert Franklin Curran was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1927 to 1936.

Arthur Ritchie Berry was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1922 to 1936.

Andrew Edmond Foster was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1922 to 1927, and again from 1932 to 1936.

Philippe Adjutor Talbot was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1915 to 1936, and was Speaker of the Assembly from 1923 to 1936. His name sometimes appears as Peter Talbot.

John Muirhead was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1922 to 1936.

William McKinnell

William Clarke McKinnell was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1920 to 1936.

Ewan Alexander McPherson was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the House of Commons of Canada from 1926 to 1930. He was also a member of the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1914 to 1920 and from 1932 to 1936, and served as a cabinet minister in the government of John Bracken.

Robert Alexander Hoey was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He was a member of the House of Commons of Canada from 1921 to 1925, served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1927 to 1936, and was a cabinet minister in the government of John Bracken.

Clifford Barclay was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served as a member of the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1922 to 1927, and again from 1932 to 1936.

The 1922 Manitoba general election was held on July 18, 1922 to elect Members of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Manitoba, Canada. The United Farmers of Manitoba won a narrow majority in the legislature.

Tobias Norris

Tobias Crawford Norris was a Canadian politician who served as the tenth Premier of Manitoba from 1915 to 1922. Norris was a member of the Liberal Party.

References

  1. 1 2 3 "Thomas Wolstenholme (1870-1952)". Memorable Manitobans. Manitoba Historical Society. Retrieved 2013-02-02.
  2. 1 2 3 "MLA Biographies - Deceased". Legislative Assembly of Manitoba. Archived from the original on 2014-03-30.