Thomas Wotton, 2nd Baron Wotton

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Thomas Wotton, 2nd Baron Wotton (1587 – 2 April 1630) was an English peer.

The Peerage of England comprises all peerages created in the Kingdom of England before the Act of Union in 1707. In that year, the Peerages of England and Scotland were replaced by one Peerage of Great Britain.

Wotton was the eldest son and heir of Edward Wotton, 1st Baron Wotton, and inherited his father's title in 1626. In 1608, he married Mary Throckmorton and they had three daughters:

Edward Wotton, 1st Baron Wotton English diplomat and Baron

Edward Wotton, 1st Baron Wotton (1548–1626) was an English diplomat and administrator. From 1612 to 1613, he served as a Lord of the Treasury. Wotton was Treasurer of the Household from 1616 to 1618, and also served as Lord Lieutenant of Kent from 1604 until 1620.

Katherine Stanhope, Countess of Chesterfield English courtier

Katherine Stanhope, Countess of Chesterfield (1609–1667) was the governess and confidante of Mary, Princess Royal and Princess of Orange, and was the first woman to hold the office of Postmaster General of England.

Baptist Noel, 3rd Viscount Campden (1611–1682) was an English politician. He was Lord Lieutenant of Rutland, Custos Rotulorum of Rutland and the Member of Parliament for Rutland.

Sir Edward Hales, 2nd Baronet was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1660 to 1681.

As he died without a male heir, Lord Wotton's title became extinct in 1630.

Peerage of England
Preceded by
Edward Wotton
Baron Wotton
1626–1630
Succeeded by
Title extinct


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