Thomas Wright (cricketer, born 1900)

Last updated

Thomas John Wright (5 March 1900 7 November 1962) was an English amateur first-class cricketer, who played one match for Yorkshire County Cricket Club in 1919. [1]

Amateur status had a special meaning in English cricket. The amateur in this context was not merely someone who played cricket in his spare time but a particular type of first-class cricketer who existed officially until 1962, when the distinction between amateurs and professionals was abolished and all first-class players became nominally professional.

First-class cricket is an official classification of the highest-standard international or domestic matches in the sport of cricket. A first-class match is of three or more days' scheduled duration between two sides of eleven players each and is officially adjudged to be worthy of the status by virtue of the standard of the competing teams. Matches must allow for the teams to play two innings each although, in practice, a team might play only one innings or none at all.

Yorkshire County Cricket Club English cricket club

Yorkshire County Cricket Club is one of eighteen first-class county clubs within the domestic cricket structure of England and Wales. It represents the historic county of Yorkshire. The club's limited overs team is called the Yorkshire Vikings. Yorkshire teams formed by earlier organisations, essentially the old Sheffield Cricket Club, played top-class cricket from the 18th century and the county club has always held first-class status. Yorkshire have competed in the County Championship since the official start of the competition in 1890 and have played in every top-level domestic cricket competition in England.

Born in North Ormesby, near Middlesbrough, Yorkshire, England, Wright was 19 years old when he scored twelve runs in his only innings, and he did not bowl. [1] The two day, first-class match, against Cambridge University at Fenners, was drawn in unusual circumstances. Cambridge were bowled out by Blackburn and Smith for 170, with Yorkshire scoring 383 in reply, including Wright's 12 runs batting at number six. Cambridge rallied to post 300, setting Yorkshire 87 to win. Wilfred Rhodes and Percy Holmes could only muster 80 runs in the twenty eight overs bowled, before the game was drawn.

North Ormesby area in Middlesbrough, England

North Ormesby is an area in the town and unitary authority of Middlesbrough, in the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England. The population of the Middlesbrough ward as taken at the 2011 census was 6,268. It is situated just to the south of the River Tees and the A66, and is adjacent to the Cargo Fleet and South Bank areas of Middlesbrough. The Teesdale Way long distance trail passes just to the north of North Ormesby. Its name, as well as those of various streets in the locality, alludes to the support given to the initial construction of North Ormesby, a "new town", in the later 19th century by contemporary members of the nearby Ormesby-based Pennyman family.

Middlesbrough Unitary authority in England

Middlesbrough is a large industrial town on the south bank of the River Tees in North Yorkshire, northeast England, founded in 1830. The local council, a unitary authority, is Middlesbrough Borough Council. The 2011 Census recorded the borough's total resident population as 138,400 and the wider urban settlement with a population of 174,700, technically making Middlesbrough the largest urban subdivision in the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire. Middlesbrough is part of the larger built-up area of Teesside which had an overall population of 376,333 at the 2011 Census.

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north-northwest. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

He later became an audiologist. Wright died in Aberystwyth, Wales, in November 1962, aged 62. [2]

Audiology branch of science that studies hearing, balance, and related disorders

Audiology is a branch of science that studies hearing, balance, and related disorders. Its practitioners, who treat those with hearing loss and proactively prevent related damage, are audiologists. By employing various testing strategies, audiologists aim to determine whether someone has normal sensitivity to sounds. If hearing loss is identified, audiologists determine which portions of hearing are affected, to what degree, and where the lesion causing the hearing loss is found. If an audiologist determines that a hearing loss or vestibular abnormality is present he or she will provide recommendations for interventions or rehabilitation.

Aberystwyth town in Ceredigion, Wales

Aberystwyth is an ancient market town, administrative centre, community, and holiday resort in Ceredigion, Wales. It is located near the confluence of the Ystwyth and the Afon Rheidol.

Wales Country in northwest Europe, part of the United Kingdom

Wales is a country that is part of the United Kingdom and the island of Great Britain. It is bordered by England to the east, the Irish Sea to the north and west, and the Bristol Channel to the south. It had a population in 2011 of 3,063,456 and has a total area of 20,779 km2 (8,023 sq mi). Wales has over 1,680 miles (2,700 km) of coastline and is largely mountainous, with its higher peaks in the north and central areas, including Snowdon, its highest summit. The country lies within the north temperate zone and has a changeable, maritime climate.

Related Research Articles

John Tasker was an English amateur first-class cricketer, who played in thirty three first-class matches between 1912 and 1919.

Lewis Franklin Wrathmell was an English first-class cricketer, who made his only appearance for Yorkshire County Cricket Club against Cambridge University, at Fenners in 1886. Batting at number four, he scored seventeen runs before he was caught by the University's wicket-keeper, Knatchbull-Hugessen, off the bowling of Dorman in Yorkshire's first innings of 154. He fell LBW to the same bowler for one run, as Yorkshire were bowled out for 124, to lose the game by twenty six runs.

Ray Bloom was an English first-class cricketer, who played one match for Yorkshire in 1964. A left-handed batsman, he made his solitary appearance against Kent at Dover, scoring two runs before being bowled by Derek Underwood in his only innings, and taking two catches.

Thomas Burgess was an English first-class cricketer, who played one match for Yorkshire against Essex in Harrogate in 1895. A right-handed batsman, he failed to score a run in the match, and did not bowl his right arm fast medium either, as Essex won a tight match by 16 runs.

Arthur Crowther was an English first-class cricketer, who played one match for Yorkshire County Cricket Club in 1905, against Warwickshire at Dewsbury.

Albert George Day was an English first-class cricketer, who played six matches for Yorkshire County Cricket Club between 1885 and 1888.

William Lord Dyson was an English first-class cricketer, who played two matches for Yorkshire County Cricket Club in 1887 against Sussex and Surrey.

William John Haywood was an English first-class cricketer, who played one match for Yorkshire County Cricket Club in 1878, against Middlesex at Bramall Lane, Sheffield. Middlesex won by an innings and 94 runs.

Haven Kaye was an English first-class cricketer, who played eight matches for Yorkshire County Cricket Club in 1872 and 1873. A right-handed batsman, he scored 117 runs at 8.35, with a highest score of 33, made against Surrey. He also took three catches, but was not called upon to bowl his right arm, round arm, fast medium.

Herbert Lee was an English first-class cricketer, who played five matches for Yorkshire County Cricket Club in 1885.

John Padgett was an English first-class cricketer, who played six matches for Yorkshire County Cricket Club between 1882 and 1889, and one match for Lord Hawke's XI in 1889.

John Parratt was an English first-class cricketer, who played two matches for Yorkshire County Cricket Club between 1888 and 1890.

John Henry Pearson was an English first-class cricketer, who played three matches for Yorkshire County Cricket Club from 1934 to 1936. He also appeared for the Yorkshire Second XI between 1933 and 1936.

George Pollitt was an English first-class cricketer, who played one match for Yorkshire County Cricket Club in 1899. Unusually for a 'one match wonder' he was highly successful in his only innings, scoring 51 against Hampshire in a drawn match at Park Avenue, Bradford. He took a catch but did not bowl. He also played for the Yorkshire Second XI during that year, and for Bedfordshire from 1904 to 1906.

Herbert Edward Rhodes was an English amateur first-class cricketer, who played ten first-class matches for Yorkshire County Cricket Club from 1878 to 1883, and twenty five matches overall for teams including the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC) (1878–1883), England XI (1879), A.W. Ridley's XI (1879), Gentlemen of England (1881–1882) and Orleans Club (1883). He played for Warwickshire in 1890 in non first-class cricket.

Horace Rudston was an English first-class cricketer, who played twenty one games for Yorkshire County Cricket Club between 1902 and 1907, and one match for the North of England in 1905. He also played for the Yorkshire Second XI (1900-1910), Yorkshire Colts (1900-1902) and Yorkshire Cricket Council (1903).

William Smith was an English first-class cricketer, who played eleven matches for Yorkshire County Cricket Club from 1865 to 1874.

Charles Edward Ullathorne was an English first-class cricketer, who played twenty seven matches for Yorkshire County Cricket Club from 1868 to 1875, three for the United North of England Eleven from 1872 to 1875, and once for the North of England in 1875.

Henry Robinson was an English first-class cricketer, who played one match for Yorkshire County Cricket Club against Derbyshire, at the County Ground, Derby, in 1879. Batting down the order, Robinson scored 4 and 1. He bowled ten overs and took one wicket for 20 runs, but Derbyshire ran out winners by an innings and two runs.

William Oates was an Irish first-class cricketer, who played in seven first-class matches for Yorkshire in 1874 and 1875. He became the first Irish-born cricketer to appear for Yorkshire.

References

  1. 1 2 Warner, David (2011). The Yorkshire County Cricket Club: 2011 Yearbook (113th ed.). Ilkley, Yorkshire: Great Northern Books. p. 382. ISBN   978-1-905080-85-4.
  2. Warner, David (2012). The Yorkshire County Cricket Club: 2012 Yearbook (114th ed.). Ilkley, Yorkshire: Great Northern Books. pp. 77–79. ISBN   978-1-905080-06-9.