Thomas Wright Everett

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Thomas Wright Everett (November 4, 1823 – September 4, 1895) was an early American resident of the Kingdom of Hawaii who served as the last Governor of Maui from 1892 to 1893.

Kingdom of Hawaii Established during the years 1795 to 1810, overthrown in 1893–1894

The Kingdom of Hawaiʻi originated in 1795 with the unification of the independent islands of Hawaiʻi, Oʻahu, Maui, Molokaʻi, and Lānaʻi under one government. In 1810, the whole Hawaiian Islands became unified when Kauaʻi and Niʻihau joined the Kingdom of Hawai‘i voluntarily and without bloodshed or war. Two major dynastic families ruled the kingdom: the House of Kamehameha and the House of Kalākaua.

The Governor of Maui was the royal governor or viceroy of the Island of Maui in the Kingdom of Hawaii. The Governor of Maui resided at Lahaina and was usually a Hawaiian chief or prince and could even be a woman. The governor had authority over four of the eight islands: Maui, Molokaʻi, Lānaʻi, and Kahoʻolawe. It was up to the governor to appoint lieutenant governors to assist them. The governor had replaced the old Moʻi of Maui, but sovereignty remained with the king. The island governors were under the jurisdiction of the Ministers of the Interiors.

Life

Everett was born in Boston, Massachusetts on November 4, 1823, to Thomas Everett (1791–1837), a Boston merchant from Dorchester, and Nancy Williams Wright (1789–1858). He was a descendant of American pioneer Richard Everett, founder of the city of Springfield and the town of Dedham. After finishing school, he learned the printer's trade at West Brookfield and in 1848, he returned to Boston to work. In 1849, he traveled to San Francisco aboard the bark Orb to take part in the California Gold Rush. However, on November 15, 1849, he left California and traveled to Honolulu in the Kingdom of Hawaii aboard the bark Memnom. In Hawaii, he started life as a trader and sold produce and supplies to visiting American whaling ships. [1] [2]

Boston Capital city of Massachusetts, United States

Boston is the capital and most populous city of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States. The city proper covers 48 square miles (124 km2) with an estimated population of 685,094 in 2017, making it also the most populous city in New England. Boston is the seat of Suffolk County as well, although the county government was disbanded on July 1, 1999. The city is the economic and cultural anchor of a substantially larger metropolitan area known as Greater Boston, a metropolitan statistical area (MSA) home to a census-estimated 4.8 million people in 2016 and ranking as the tenth-largest such area in the country. As a combined statistical area (CSA), this wider commuting region is home to some 8.2 million people, making it the sixth-largest in the United States.

Massachusetts State of the United States of America

Massachusetts, officially the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, is the most populous state in the New England region of the northeastern United States. It borders on the Atlantic Ocean to the east, the states of Connecticut and Rhode Island to the south, New Hampshire and Vermont to the north, and New York to the west. The state is named after the Massachusett tribe, which once inhabited the east side of the area, and is one of the original thirteen states. The capital of Massachusetts is Boston, which is also the most populous city in New England. Over 80% of Massachusetts's population lives in the Greater Boston metropolitan area, a region influential upon American history, academia, and industry. Originally dependent on agriculture, fishing and trade, Massachusetts was transformed into a manufacturing center during the Industrial Revolution. During the 20th century, Massachusetts's economy shifted from manufacturing to services. Modern Massachusetts is a global leader in biotechnology, engineering, higher education, finance, and maritime trade.

Dorchester, Boston Neighborhood of Boston in Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States

Dorchester is a Boston neighborhood comprising more than 6 square miles (16 km2) in the City of Boston, Massachusetts, United States. Originally, Dorchester was a separate town, founded by Puritans who emigrated in 1630 from Dorchester, Dorset, England to the Massachusetts Bay Colony. This dissolved municipality, Boston's largest neighborhood by far, is often divided by city planners in order to create two planning areas roughly equivalent in size and population to other Boston neighborhoods.

He later settled on the island of Maui, and married Ellen Richardson (1824–1890), the daughter of George Richardson, on February 8, 1860, at Lahaina. They did not have any children, but he adopted many orphaned relatives of his wife. [1] Residing in the Kingdom of Hawaii for the remainder of his life, Everett held the position deputy sheriff and sheriff of the island of Maui for more than forty years. He also co-owned the Ulupalakua Ranch, which produced potatoes, flour, wheat corn and other produce, and a homestead in Waikapu. [2] [3] On May 17, 1892. Queen Liliuokalani appointed Everett to the restored office of Governor of Maui. The office of governors had been abolished by the legislature of the Kingdom after the Bayonet Constitution of 1887. Prior to this, the position was last held by Robert Hoapili Baker, a high chief and royal favorite of King Kalākaua. Everett presided as the Governor of Maui and the adjacent islands of Molokai and Lanai. He did not hold the post for long. After the overthrow of the Kingdom of Hawaii in January 1893, the Provisional Government of Hawaii passed an act abolishing the island governorships again; this act passed on February 27 and went into effect on February 28. [4] [5] [6]

Maui island of the Hawaiian Islands in the Pacific Ocean

The island of Maui is the second-largest of the Hawaiian Islands at 727.2 square miles (1,883 km2) and is the 17th largest island in the United States. Maui is part of the State of Hawaii and is the largest of Maui County's four islands, which include Molokaʻi, Lānaʻi, and unpopulated Kahoʻolawe. In 2010, Maui had a population of 144,444, third-highest of the Hawaiian Islands, behind that of Oʻahu and Hawaiʻi Island. Kahului is the largest census-designated place (CDP) on the island with a population of 26,337 as of 2010 and is the commercial and financial hub of the island. Wailuku is the seat of Maui County and is the third-largest CDP as of 2010. Other significant places include Kīhei, Lahaina, Makawao, Pukalani, Pāʻia, Kula, Haʻikū, and Hāna.

A sheriff is a government official, with varying duties, existing in some countries with historical ties to England, where the office originated. There is an analogous although independently developed office in Iceland that is commonly translated to English as sheriff, and this is discussed below.

Waikapu, Hawaii Census-designated place in Hawaii, United States

Waikapū is a census-designated place (CDP) in Maui County, Hawaiʻi, United States. The population was 2,965 at the 2010 census.

Ex-Governor Everett died at his homestead at Waikapu, Maui, on September 4, 1895. After a funeral attended by close friends, he was buried next to his wife Ellen. [2] His obituary in the Honolulu-based newspaper The Independent described Everett as:

Tom Everett was a true New Englander. He was gruff and at times even rough, but nothing can be better express the charter of the man than the few words said by a former Hawaiian employee of the deceased last night to the editor of this paper. "Tom dead? True! An honest man is dead." [2]

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References

  1. 1 2 Everett, Edward Franklin (1902). Descendants of Richard Everett of Dedham, Mass. Boston: Privately Printed, T. R. Marvin & Son Printers. pp. 117–118. OCLC   191111923.
  2. 1 2 3 4 "Latest News From Maui". The Pacific Commercial Advertiser. Honolulu. September 9, 1895. p. 1.; "Death of Everett". The Independent. Honolulu. September 7, 1895. p. 3.; "Death of Thomas W. Everett". Evening Bulletin. Honolulu. September 9, 1895. p. 1.; "Latest News From Maui". The Hawaiian Gazette. Honolulu. September 10, 1895. p. 5.; "Maui Residents Are Uneasy". The Hawaiian Gazette. Honolulu. September 17, 1895. p. 6.
  3. "Everett, Thomas W. office record". state archives digital collections. state of Hawaii. Retrieved June 17, 2014.
  4. Newbury, Colin (2001). "Patronage and Bureaucracy in the Hawaiian Kingdom, 1840–1893". Pacific Studies. Laie, HI: Brigham Young University, Hawaii Campus. 24 (1–2): 16, 29–30. OCLC   607265842. Archived from the original on 2012-04-15.; An Act To Abolish The Office Of Governor. Laws of His Majesty Kalakaua, King of the Hawaiian Islands. Honolulu: Gazette Publishing Company. August 23, 1888. p. 101.; An Act To Establish A Governor On Each Of The Islands Of Oahu, Maui, Hawaii and Kauai. Laws of His Majesty Kalakaua, King of the Hawaiian Islands. Honolulu: Gazette Publishing Company. November 14, 1890. pp. 159–160.; Act 19 – An Act to Repeal an Act Entitled 'An Act to Establish a Governor on Each of the Islands of Oahu, Maui, Hawaii, and Kauai'. Laws of the Provisional Government of the Hawaiian Islands. Honolulu: Robert Grieve, Steam Book And Job Printer. February 27, 1893. p. 44.
  5. "Governor of Maui, Molokai and Lanai" (PDF). official archives. state of Hawaii. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 21, 2011. Retrieved September 1, 2009.
  6. Thrum, Thomas G., ed. (1892). "Hawaiian Register and Directory for 1892". Hawaiian Almanac and Annual for 1892. Honolulu: Honolulu Star-Bulletin. p. 144. hdl:10524/662.; Thrum, Thomas G., ed. (1893). "Hawaiian Register and Directory for 1893". Hawaiian Almanac and Annual for 1893. Honolulu: Honolulu Star-Bulletin. p. 139. hdl:10524/663.
Government offices
Vacant
Title last held by
Robert Hoapili Baker
Governor of Maui
1892–1893
Position abolished