Thomas Wyer

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Thomas Wyer (1789 December 23, 1848) was a political figure in New Brunswick. [1] He represented Charlotte in the Legislative Assembly of New Brunswick from 1827 to 1840.

New Brunswick province in Canada

New Brunswick is one of four Atlantic provinces on the east coast of Canada. According to the Constitution of Canada, New Brunswick is the only bilingual province. About two thirds of the population declare themselves anglophones and a third francophones. One third of the overall population describe themselves as bilingual. Atypically for Canada, only about half of the population lives in urban areas, mostly in Greater Moncton, Greater Saint John and the capital Fredericton.

Legislative Assembly of New Brunswick single house, former lower house, of New Brunswick legislature

The Legislative Assembly of New Brunswick is located in Fredericton. It was established in Saint John de jure when the colony was created in 1784, but came into session only in 1786, following the first elections in late 1785. It was the lower house in a bicameral legislature until 1891, when its upper house counterpart, the Legislative Council of New Brunswick, was abolished. Its members are called "Members of the Legislative Assembly," commonly referred to as "MLAs".

He was the son of Thomas Wyer, a United Empire Loyalist who came to St. Andrews, New Brunswick from Falmouth (later Portland, Maine), and Joanna Pote. [1] Wyer served as a justice in the Court of Common Pleas, as a lieutenant in the militia, as commissioner of wrecks and as a member of the board of education. [2] In 1840, Wyer was named to the Legislative Council of New Brunswick. [3]

United Empire Loyalist British Loyalists who resettled in British North America and other British Colonies

United Empire Loyalists is an honorific which was first given by the 1st Lord Dorchester, the Governor of Quebec, and Governor-General of the Canadas, to American Loyalists who resettled in British North America during or after the American Revolution. The Loyalists were also referred to informally as the "King's Loyal Americans". At the time, the demonym Canadian or Canadien was used to refer to the indigenous First Nations groups and the French settlers inhabiting the Province of Quebec.

St. Andrews, New Brunswick Town in New Brunswick, Canada

Saint Andrews is a town in Charlotte County, New Brunswick, Canada. It is sometimes referred to in tourism marketing by its unofficial nickname "St. Andrews By-the-Sea". It is also known as "Qonasqamkuk" by the Peskotomuhkati (Passamaquoddy) Nation.

Portland, Maine largest city in Maine

Portland is the most populous city in the U.S. state of Maine, with a population of 67,067 as of 2017. The Greater Portland metropolitan area is home to over half a million people, more than one-third of Maine's total population, making it the most populous metro in northern New England. Portland is Maine's economic center, with an economy that relies on the service sector and tourism. The Old Port district is a popular destination known for its 19th-century architecture and nightlife. Marine industry still plays an important role in the city's economy, with an active waterfront that supports fishing and commercial shipping. The Port of Portland is the largest tonnage seaport in New England.

His daughter Susan married George Dixon Street, who also represented Charlotte in the assembly. [4]

George Dixon Street was a lawyer, judge and political figure in New Brunswick. He represented Charlotte in the Legislative Assembly of New Brunswick from 1856 to 1857.

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