Thomas Wyer

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Thomas Wyer (1789 December 23, 1848) was a political figure in New Brunswick. [1] He represented Charlotte in the Legislative Assembly of New Brunswick from 1827 to 1840.

He was the son of Thomas Wyer, a United Empire Loyalist who came to St. Andrews, New Brunswick from Falmouth (later Portland, Maine), and Joanna Pote. [1] Wyer served as a justice in the Court of Common Pleas, as a lieutenant in the militia, as commissioner of wrecks and as a member of the board of education. [2] In 1840, Wyer was named to the Legislative Council of New Brunswick. [3]

His daughter Susan married George Dixon Street, who also represented Charlotte in the assembly. [4]

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References

  1. 1 2 "Chest of drawers". Artefacts Canada. Retrieved 2011-01-27.
  2. Sabine, Lorenzo (2009). Biographical Sketches of Loyalists of the American Revolution. Vol. 3. Applewood Books. p. 463. ISBN   978-1-4290-1953-8.
  3. Journals of the House of Assembly of the Province of New Brunswick. New Brunswick. House of Assembly. 1840. p.  8.
  4. "The Canadian biographical dictionary and portrait gallery of eminent and self-made men Quebec and the Maritime provinces". 1881. p. 644.