Thomas Wynn, 2nd Baron Newborough

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Thomas John Wynn, 2nd Baron Newborough (3 April 1802 – 15 November 1832), was a British peer.

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Plas Glynllifon - seat of the Lords Newborough Plas Glynllifon.jpg
Plas Glynllifon - seat of the Lords Newborough

Background

Newborough was the eldest son of Thomas Wynn, 1st Baron Newborough of Glynllifon, and Maria Stella Petronilla, daughter of Lorenzo Chiappini. [1]

Thomas Wynn, 1st Baron Newborough British politician

Thomas Wynn, 1st Baron Newborough, known as Sir Thomas Wynn, 3rd Baronet, from 1773 to 1776, was a British politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1761 and 1807.

Glynllifon Grade I listed building in Gwynedd.

Glynllifon is the name of the old estate which belonged to the Lords Newborough, near the village of Llandwrog on the main A499 road between Pwllheli and Caernarfon in Gwynedd, Wales The original mansion is now a privately owned Country House hotel and wedding venue.

Maria Stella French noble

Maria Stella Wynn, Lady Newborough was an Italian-born memoirist, the self-styled legitimate daughter of Louis Philippe II, Duke of Orléans. She was the second wife of the Welsh peer Thomas Wynn, 1st Baron Newborough, after whose death she married the Estonian count Eduard Ungern-Sternberg.

Political career

Newborough succeeded his father in the barony in 1807. However, as this was an Irish peerage it did not entitle him to a seat in the House of Lords. He was instead elected to the House of Commons for Carnarvonshire in 1826, a seat he held until 1830. [2]

The Peerage of Ireland consists of those titles of nobility created by the English monarchs in their capacity as Lord or King of Ireland, or later by monarchs of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. The creation of such titles came to an end in the 19th century. The ranks of the Irish peerage are Duke, Marquess, Earl, Viscount and Baron. As of 2016, there were 135 titles in the Peerage of Ireland extant: two dukedoms, ten marquessates, 43 earldoms, 28 viscountcies, and 52 baronies. The Crown of the United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland continues to exercise jurisdiction over the Peerage of Ireland, including those peers whose titles derive from places located in what is now the Republic of Ireland. Article 40.2 of the Irish Constitution forbids the state conferring titles of nobility and a citizen may not accept titles of nobility or honour except with the prior approval of the Government. As stated above, this issue does not arise in respect of the Peerage of Ireland, as no creations of titles in it have been made since the Constitution came into force.

House of Lords upper house in the Parliament of the United Kingdom

The House of Lords, also known as the House of Peers, is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Membership is granted by appointment or else by heredity or official function. Like the House of Commons, it meets in the Palace of Westminster. Officially, the full name of the house is the Right Honourable the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled.

Personal life

Lord Newborough died in November 1832, aged 30. He was unmarried and was succeeded by his younger brother, Spencer Bulkeley Wynn, 3rd Baron Newborough. [1]

Spencer Bulkeley Wynn, 3rd Baron Newborough peer

Spencer Bulkeley Wynn was Deputy Lieutenant of Carnarvon from 1846 and High Sheriff of Anglesey in 1847.

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References

  1. 1 2 Lundy, Darryl. "Thomas John Wynn, 2nd Baron Newborough". The Peerage. p. 8498 § 84974.[ unreliable source ]
  2. leighrayment.com House of Commons: Caernarfon-Cambridgeshire South West
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Sir Robert Williams, Bt
Member of Parliament for Carnarvonshire
1826–1830
Succeeded by
Charles Griffith-Wynne
Peerage of Ireland
Preceded by
Thomas Wynn
Baron Newborough
1807–1832
Succeeded by
Spencer Bulkeley Wynn