Thomas Y. Fitzpatrick

Last updated
Thomas Y. Fitzpatrick
Thomas-Y.-Fitzpatrick.jpg
Member of the U.S.HouseofRepresentatives
from Kentucky's 10th district
In office
March 4, 1897 March 3, 1901
Preceded by Nathan T. Hopkins
Succeeded by James Bamford White
Member of the Kentucky House of Representatives
In office
1876-1877
Personal details
Born(1850-09-20)September 20, 1850
Floyd County, Kentucky
DiedJanuary 21, 1906(1906-01-21) (aged 55)
Frankfort, Kentucky
Resting place Frankfort Cemetery
Political party Democratic
Profession Lawyer

Thomas Young Fitzpatrick (September 20, 1850 – January 21, 1906) was a U.S. Representative from Kentucky.

United States House of Representatives lower house of the United States Congress

The United States House of Representatives is the lower chamber of the United States Congress, the Senate being the upper chamber. Together they compose the legislature of the United States.

Kentucky State of the United States of America

Kentucky, officially the Commonwealth of Kentucky, is a state located in the east south-central region of the United States. Although styled as the "State of Kentucky" in the law creating it, (because in Kentucky's first constitution, the name state was used) Kentucky is one of four U.S. states constituted as a commonwealth. Originally a part of Virginia, in 1792 Kentucky split from it and became the 15th state to join the Union. Kentucky is the 37th most extensive and the 26th most populous of the 50 United States.

Born near Prestonsburg, Kentucky, Fitzpatrick attended the common schools. He studied law. He was admitted to the bar in 1877 and practiced. County judge in 1874 and 1875. He served as member of the State house of representatives in 1876 and 1877. County attorney 1880-1884.

Prestonsburg, Kentucky City in Kentucky, United States

Prestonsburg is a home rule-class city in and the county seat of Floyd County, Kentucky, United States. The population was 3,255 at the time of the 2010 census, down from 3,612 at the 2000 census.

Admission to the bar in the United States

Admission to the bar in the United States is the granting of permission by a particular court system to a lawyer to practice law in the jurisdiction and before those courts. Each U.S. state and similar jurisdiction has its own court system and sets its own rules for bar admission, which can lead to different admission standards among states. In most cases, a person is "admitted" or "called" to the bar of the highest court in the jurisdiction and is thereby authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction. In addition, Federal Courts of the United States, although often overlapping in admission standards with states, set their own requirements for practice in each of those courts.

Kentucky House of Representatives lower house of the Kentucky General Assembly

The Kentucky House of Representatives is the lower house of the Kentucky General Assembly. It is composed of 100 Representatives elected from single-member districts throughout the Commonwealth. Not more than two counties can be joined to form a House district, except when necessary to preserve the principle of equal representation. Representatives are elected to two-year terms with no term limits. The Kentucky House of Representatives convenes at the State Capitol in Frankfort.

Fitzpatrick was elected as a Democrat to the Fifty-fifth and Fifty-sixth Congresses (March 4, 1897 – March 3, 1901). He died in Frankfort, Kentucky, January 21, 1906. He was interred in Frankfort Cemetery.

Democratic Party (United States) Major political party in the United States

The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party. Tracing its heritage back to Thomas Jefferson and James Madison's Democratic-Republican Party, the modern-day Democratic Party was founded around 1828 by supporters of Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest active political party.

55th United States Congress

The Fifty-fifth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, DC from March 4, 1897, to March 4, 1899, during the first two years of William McKinley's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Eleventh Census of the United States in 1890. Both chambers had a Republican majority. There was one African-American member, George Henry White, a Republican from the state of North Carolina.

56th United States Congress 1899-1901 legislative term

The Fifty-sixth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, DC from March 4, 1899, to March 4, 1901, during the third and fourth years of William McKinley's presidency. The apportionment of seats in this House of Representatives was based on the Eleventh Census of the United States in 1890. Both chambers had a Republican majority. There was one African-American member, George Henry White of North Carolina, who served his second and final term as a Representative in this Congress, and would be the last black member of Congress until 1928, and the last black member of Congress from the South until 1972.

Related Research Articles

John Brown (Kentucky) American lawyer and statesman

John Brown was an American lawyer and statesman who participated in the development and formation of the State of Kentucky after the American Revolutionary War.

Thomas H. Paynter American politician

Thomas Hanson Paynter was a United States Senator and Representative from Kentucky.

William Clayton Anderson was a nineteenth-century lawyer and politician. He served as a United States Representative from Kentucky.

Andrew Alkire Trumbo was a United States Representative from Kentucky. He was born in Bath County, Kentucky and attended the common schools. He was employed in the county clerk's office. After studying law, he was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Owingsville, Kentucky in 1824. He was the clerk of Bath County in 1830 and the Commonwealth attorney for Bath County in 1830.

Thomas Francis Marshall American politician

Thomas Francis Marshall was a nineteenth-century politician and lawyer from Kentucky. He was the nephew of John Marshall.

Isaac Goodnight American politician

Isaac Herschel Goodnight was a United States Representative from Kentucky.

Alexander B. Montgomery American politician

Alexander Brooks Montgomery was a U.S. Representative from Kentucky.

David Grant Colson American politician

David Grant Colson was an American politician from the State of Kentucky who served as a U.S. Representative from Kentucky's 11th congressional district. He previously served in the Kentucky House of Representatives and as the mayor of Middlesboro.

David Hayes Kincheloe American politician

David Hayes Kincheloe was a United States Representative from Kentucky and a Judge of the United States Customs Court.

Evan E. Settle American politician

Evan Evans Settle was a U.S. Representative from Kentucky.

Henry Dixon Allen U.S. Representative

Henry Dixon Allen was a U.S. Representative from Kentucky.

South Trimble American politician

South Trimble was a U.S. Representative from Kentucky. He was a prominent member of the famed South–Cockrell–Hargis-Trimble family of Southern politicians.

Thomas Austin Robertson was a U.S. Representative from Kentucky.

Thomas Alexander Marshall was a U.S. Representative from Kentucky, son of Humphrey Marshall (1760–1841).

Thomas Laurens Jones American congressman for Kentucky

Thomas Laurens Jones was a U.S. Representative from Kentucky.

William Thomas Ellis American politician

William Thomas Ellis was a U.S. Representative from Kentucky.

William Worth Dickerson was a U.S. Representative from Kentucky.

Robert M. Knapp American politician

Robert McCarty Knapp was a U.S. Representative from Illinois, brother of Anthony Lausett Knapp.

Jacob Call was a U.S. Representative from Indiana.

William Johnson Stone American politician

William Johnson Stone was a US Representative from Kentucky.

References

The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all present and former members of the United States Congress and its predecessor, the Continental Congress. Also included are Delegates from territories and the District of Columbia and Resident Commissioners from the Philippines and Puerto Rico.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress website http://bioguide.congress.gov .

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Nathan T. Hopkins
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Kentucky's 10th congressional district

March 4, 1897 March 3, 1901 (obsolete district)
Succeeded by
James B. White