Thomas Yorke (1658–1716)

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Thomas Yorke (1658–1716) of Gouthwaite Hall and Richmond, Yorkshire was an English landowner and Whig politician, who sat in the House of Commons of England and Great Britain between 1689 and 1716, with two short intervals.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

Gouthwaite Hall, Nidderdale, North Yorkshire Gouthwaite Hall-geograph-5534881.jpg
Gouthwaite Hall, Nidderdale, North Yorkshire

Yorke was born in 1658, the son of John Yorke of Gouthwaite Hall and his wife Mary Norton daughter of Maulger Norton of St Nicholas, near Richmond. [1] His father was MP for Richmond in the North Riding of Yorkshire from 1661 to 1663. At the age of four he inherited his father's estates Stonebeck Down (including Gouthwaite Hall) and Stonebeck Up in Nidderdale and in Richmond. In 1674 his mother Mary added to his inheritance by the purchase of the manor of Bewerley in Nidderdale. [2] In 1680 he married Katherine Lister, the heiress of estates in Lancashire. [3]

Maulger Norton was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1640.

North Riding of Yorkshire

The North Riding of Yorkshire is one of the three historic subdivisions (ridings) of the English county of Yorkshire, alongside the East and West ridings. From the Restoration it was used as a lieutenancy area, having been part of the Yorkshire lieutenancy previously. The three ridings were treated as three counties for many purposes, such as having separate quarter sessions. An administrative county was created with a county council in 1889 under the Local Government Act 1888 on the historic boundaries. In 1974 both the administrative county and the Lieutenancy of the North Riding of Yorkshire were abolished, being succeeded in most of the riding by the new non-metropolitan county of North Yorkshire.

Stonebeck Down is a civil parish in Harrogate district, North Yorkshire, England. The main settlements in the parish are the village of Ramsgill and the hamlets of Stean and Heathfield. The population of the parish in the 2011 census was 192.

Yorke was elected Member of Parliament for the Richmond constituency in the Convention Parliament of 1689 as a Whig. He was a Commissioner for assessment, for the North and West Ridings of Yorkshire from 1689 to 1690 and was made a Justice of the Peace for the North Riding by 1690, retaining the role for the rest of his life. He lost his seat at the 1690 English general election, but was re-elected at the 1695 English general election. He signed the Association, and voted for the attainder of Sir John Fenwick on 25 November 1696. He was returned unopposed at the 1698 English general election and showed his support for the Whig Junto. At the two general elections of 1701, he was again returned unopposed, and was generally inactive in Parliament. He was returned unopposed at the 1702 English general election and did not vote for the Tack. He faced a contest at the 1705 English general election and was returned successfully. He voted for the Court candidate as Speaker on 25 October 1705. At the 1708 British general election, he was returned unopposed as Whig MP and voted for the naturalisation of the Palatines. As a Whig he probably voted for the impeachment of Dr Sachaverell, but the record on this is conflicting. He let his son John take his seat at the 1710 British general election. He was returned again for Richmond in a bitter contest at the 1713 British general election and voted against the expulsion of Richard Steele on 18 March 1714. [4] He retained his seat at the 1715 British general election. [5]

Richmond (Yorks) (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1868 onwards

Richmond (Yorks) is a constituency in North Yorkshire represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since May 2015 by Rishi Sunak, a Conservative.

Convention Parliament (1689) Parliament of England held in 1689

The English Convention (1689) was an assembly of the Parliament of England which transferred the crowns of England, Scotland and Ireland from James II to William III and Mary II.

The 1690 English general election occurred after the dissolution of the Convention Parliament summoned in the aftermath of the Glorious Revolution, and saw the partisan feuds in that parliament continue in the constituencies. The Tories made significant gains against their opponents, particularly in the contested counties and boroughs, as the electorate saw the Whigs increasingly as a source of instability and a threat to the Church of England.

Yorke died in 1716 and was buried in Richmond parish church on 16 November. [6] He left three sons and four daughters. [1]

Richmond, North Yorkshire town in North Yorkshire, England

Richmond is a market town and civil parish in North Yorkshire, England and the administrative centre of the district of Richmondshire. Historically in the North Riding of Yorkshire, it is situated on the edge of the Yorkshire Dales National Park, and one of the park's tourist centres. Richmond is the most duplicated UK placename, with 56 occurrences worldwide.

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References

  1. 1 2 "YORKE, Thomas (1658-1716), of Richmond, Yorks". History of Parliament Online (1660-1690). Retrieved 5 August 2019.
  2. Ashley Cooper, p.112
  3. Ashley Cooper, P.117
  4. "YORKE, Thomas (1658-1716), of Gouthwaite Hall and Richmond, Yorks". History of Parliament Online (1690-1715). Retrieved 22 August 2018.
  5. "YORKE, Thomas (1658-1716), of Gouthwaite and Richmond, Yorks". History of Parliament Online (1715-1754). Retrieved 5 August 2019.
  6. Ashley Cooper, p.133

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Parliament of England
Preceded by
Thomas Cradock
John Darcy, Lord Conyers
Member of Parliament for Richmond
1689–1690
With: John Darcy, Lord Conyers
Philip Darcy
Succeeded by
Sir Mark Milbanke, Bt
Theodore Bathurst
Preceded by
Sir Mark Milbanke, Bt
Theodore Bathurst
Member of Parliament for Richmond
1695–1707
Succeeded by
Parliament of Great Britain
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Parliament of England
Member of Parliament for Richmond
1707–1710
With: William Walsh
Harry Mordaunt
Succeeded by
John Yorke
Harry Mordaunt
Preceded by
John Yorke
Harry Mordaunt
Member of Parliament for Richmond
1713–1716
With: Harry Mordaunt
Succeeded by
John Yorke
Harry Mordaunt