Thomas and Mary Williams Homestead

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Thomas and Mary Williams Homestead

Williams homestead (Taylor, NE) from SW 2.JPG

Williams homestead, seen from the southwest
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Location 0.5 miles east of Taylor, off a gravel road
Nearest city Taylor, Nebraska
Coordinates 41°45′53″N99°22′22″W / 41.76472°N 99.37278°W / 41.76472; -99.37278 Coordinates: 41°45′53″N99°22′22″W / 41.76472°N 99.37278°W / 41.76472; -99.37278
Area 80 acres (32 ha)
Built 1884
Built by Williams, Thomas
NRHP reference # 98001565 [1]
Added to NRHP December 31, 1998

The Thomas and Mary Williams Homestead, near Taylor, Nebraska, has significance dating to 1884. Its 80-acre (32 ha) property was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1998 with seven contributing buildings and three other contributing structures. [1]

Taylor, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Taylor is a village in, and the county seat of, Loup County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 190 at the 2010 census.

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

Thomas Williams was an American Civil War veteran. The property, which includes a log house, is located approximately 0.5 miles east of Taylor. [2]

American Civil War Civil war in the United States from 1861 to 1865

The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865, between the North and the South. The Civil War is the most studied and written about episode in U.S. history. Primarily as a result of the long-standing controversy over the enslavement of black people, war broke out in April 1861 when secessionist forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina shortly after Abraham Lincoln had been inaugurated as the President of the United States. The loyalists of the Union in the North proclaimed support for the Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States in the South, who advocated for states' rights to uphold slavery.

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