Thomas and Walter Monteith House

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Thomas and Walter Monteith House
Monteith House - Albany Oregon.jpg
Location518 W 2nd Ave
Albany, Oregon
Coordinates 44°38′9.1″N123°6′37.″W / 44.635861°N 123.11028°W / 44.635861; -123.11028 Coordinates: 44°38′9.1″N123°6′37.″W / 44.635861°N 123.11028°W / 44.635861; -123.11028
Built1849
Architectural styleFederal
Part of Monteith Historic District [1] (ID80003341)
NRHP reference No. 75001586
Added to NRHP1975

Thomas and Walter Monteith House, also known as the Monteith House Museum was the first frame house built in Albany, Oregon, United States. It was built by Walter and Thomas Monteith in 1848–1850. All the house's original boards are hand-hewn due to lack of availability of steam-powered buzzsaws at that time. Originally the home served as a combination dwelling and store, but soon became the residence of Thomas and Christine (Dunbar) Monteith. [2] Described architecturally as "Rural Vernacular / Pre-Classic Revival," [3] the house was extensively remodeled in 1855 and 1880, moved 50 feet west in 1901, and in 1922 again remodeled, such that the structure little resembled the original construction. [4] The house was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1975. [4] Beginning in 1982 the house has been a museum highlighting the Monteiths' contributions to the area's community. [4] "Living history" events are periodically given at the museum. [5]

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References

  1. Witherspoon, Phyllis; McMath, George (May 26, 1978), National Register of Historic Places Inventory — Nomination Form: Monteith Historic District (PDF), retrieved April 5, 2018.
  2. Marschner, Janice (2008). Oregon 1859: A Snapshot in Time. Timber Press. p. 159. ISBN   978-0881928730 . Retrieved July 1, 2013.
  3. Friedman, Ralph (1990). In Search of Western Oregon . Caxton Press. p.  496. ISBN   0870045091 . Retrieved July 1, 2013. Monteith House.
  4. 1 2 3 "Illustrating Four Treatments in Oregon - Monteith Historic District". National Park Service. U.S. Department of the Interior. Retrieved July 1, 2013.
  5. "Thursday to Thursday". Gazette Times. Corvallis, Oregon. June 13, 2013. Retrieved July 1, 2013.