Thomas de Berkeley, 3rd Baron Berkeley

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Thomas de Berkeley, 3rd Baron Berkeley
Thomas Lord Berkeley Geograph-3939519-by-Mike-Searle.jpg
Born1290
DiedOctober 27, 1361
NationalityEnglish
Known for"the rich"
Predecessor Maurice de Berkeley, 2nd Baron Berkeley
Successor Maurice de Berkeley, 4th Baron Berkeley
Spouse(s)1. Margaret Mortimer
2. C/Katharine Clivedon
Children9
Parent(s) Maurice de Berkeley, 2nd Baron Berkeley and Eve la Zouche

Thomas de Berkeley (c. 1293 or 1296 – 27 October 1361), The Rich, feudal baron of Berkeley, of Berkeley Castle in Gloucestershire, England, was a peer. His epithet, and that of each previous and subsequent head of his family, was coined by John Smyth of Nibley (d.1641), steward of the Berkeley estates, the biographer of the family and author of "Lives of the Berkeleys".

Contents

Origins

He was the eldest son and heir of Maurice de Berkeley, 2nd Baron Berkeley by his wife Eve la Zouche.

Career

In 1327 he was made joint custodian of the deposed King Edward II, whom he received at Berkeley Castle. He was later commanded to deliver custody of the king to his fellow custodians, namely John Maltravers, 1st Baron Maltravers and Sir Thomas Gournay. He left the king at Berkeley Castle and with heavy cheere perceiving what violence was intended he journeyed to Bradley. The king was murdered at Berkeley Castle during his absence. As an accessory to the murder of the deposed king, he was tried by a jury of 12 knights in 1330 and was honourably acquitted.

Marriages and children

Arms of Berkeley ("Cornerwise"): Gules, a chevron between ten crosses pattee six in chief and four in base argent Berkeley arms.svg
Arms of Berkeley ("Cornerwise"): Gules, a chevron between ten crosses pattée six in chief and four in base argent

He married twice:

Death and succession

He died on 27 October 1361 in Gloucestershire and was succeeded by Maurice de Berkeley, 4th Baron Berkeley (born 1320, date of death unknown), eldest son and heir from his first marriage.

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References

  1. UK and Ireland, Find A Grave Index, 1300s-Current
  2. Plea rolls of the Court of Common Pleas; National Archives; http://aalt.law.uh.edu/AALT6/R2/CP40no483/483_0892.htm; first entry: mentions Katherine, formerly wife of Thomas de Berkele of Barkele, knight, as complainant; Year: 1381
  3. 1 2 "Berkeley [née Clivedon], Katherine, Lady Berkeley (d. 1385), benefactor". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/54435 . Retrieved 25 March 2021.
  4. "BERKELEY, Sir John I (1352-1428), of Beverstone castle, Glos. - History of Parliament Online". www.historyofparliamentonline.org.
Peerage of England
Preceded by Baron Berkeley
1326–1361
Succeeded by