Thomas de Brus

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Sir Thomas de Brus (c. 1284 – 9 February 1307) was a younger brother and supporter of King Robert I of Scotland, in the struggle against the English conquest. He was captured by the MacDoualls at Loch Ryan, Galloway, Scotland and later executed by the English.

Loch Ryan

Loch Ryan is a Scottish sea loch that acts as an important natural harbour for shipping, providing calm waters for ferries operating between Scotland and Northern Ireland. The town of Stranraer is the largest settlement on its shores, with ferries to and from Northern Ireland operating from Cairnryan further north on the loch.

Galloway area in southwestern Scotland

Galloway is a region in southwestern Scotland comprising the historic counties of Wigtownshire and Kirkcudbrightshire.

Born c. 1284 at Carrick, Ayrshire, Scotland a son of Robert de Brus, 6th Lord of Annandale and Margaret, Countess Of Carrick. He was married to Helen Erskine. While leading a force supporting King Robert I along with his brother Alexander de Brus composed of eighteen galleys, they landed at Loch Ryan. The force led by the Bruces was quickly overwhelmed by forces led by Dungal MacDouall, who was a supporter of the Comyns. Thomas and his brother were captured, seriously injured in the fight. He was hanged, drawn, and beheaded on 9 February 1307 in Carlisle, Cumberland, England.

Carrick, Scotland southern part of Ayrshire

Carrick is a former comital district of Scotland which today forms part of South Ayrshire.

Ayrshire Historic county in Scotland

Ayrshire is a historic county and registration county in south-west Scotland, located on the shores of the Firth of Clyde. Its principal towns include Ayr, Kilmarnock and Irvine and it borders the counties of Renfrewshire and Lanarkshire to the north-east, Dumfriesshire to the south-east, and Kirkcudbrightshire and Wigtownshire to the south. Like many other counties of Scotland it currently has no administrative function, instead being sub-divided into the council areas of North Ayrshire, South Ayrshire and East Ayrshire. It has a population of approximately 366,800.

Sir Robert VI de Brus, 6th Lord of Annandale, jure uxoris Earl of Carrick (1271–1292), Lord of Hartness, Writtle and Hatfield Broad Oak, was a cross-border lord, and participant of the Second Barons' War, Ninth Crusade, Welsh Wars, and First War of Scottish Independence.

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