Thomas de Grey, 2nd Baron Walsingham

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The Lord Walsingham

PC
Merton Hall (geograph 2418018).jpg
Merton Hall - de Grey family seat in Norfolk
Joint Postmaster General
(with The Lord Carteret 1787–1789
The Earl of Westmorland 1789–1790
The Earl of Chesterfield 1790–1794)
In office
1787–1794
Monarch George III
Prime Minister Hon. William Pitt the Younger
Preceded by The Lord Carteret
The Earl of Clarendon
Succeeded by The Earl of Chesterfield
The Earl of Leicester
Personal details
Born(1748-07-14)14 July 1748
Died16 January 1818(1818-01-16) (aged 69)
Nationality British
Spouse(s)Hon. Augusta Irby

Thomas de Grey, 2nd Baron Walsingham PC (14 July 1748 – 16 January 1818), was a British politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1774 to 1781 when he succeeded to the peerage as Baron Walsingham. He served as Joint Postmaster General and was for many years Chairman of Committees in the House of Lords. [1]

The House of Commons is the elected lower house of the bicameral parliaments of the United Kingdom and Canada and historically was the name of the lower houses of the Kingdom of England, Kingdom of Great Britain, Kingdom of Ireland, Northern Ireland, and Southern Ireland. Roughly equivalent bodies in other countries which were once part of the British Empire include the United States House of Representatives, the Australian House of Representatives, the New Zealand House of Representatives, and India's Lok Sabha.

A peerage is a legal system historically comprising various hereditary titles in a number of countries, and composed of assorted noble ranks.

Baron Walsingham

Baron Walsingham, of Walsingham in the County of Norfolk, is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain.

Contents

Biography

Walsingham was the son of William de Grey, 1st Baron Walsingham, Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, [2] and educated at Eton College from 1760 to 1765 and was admitted at Trinity Hall, Cambridge in 1766. He succeeded his father as 2nd Baron Walsingham on 9 May 1781 and inherited his Merton Hall, Norfolk estate from his uncle Thomas de Grey the same year.

William de Grey, 1st Baron Walsingham British lawyer, judge and politician

William de Grey, 1st Baron Walsingham PC KC was a British lawyer, judge and politician. He served as Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas between 1771 and 1780.

Chief Justice of the Common Pleas

The Chief Justice of the Common Pleas was the head of the Court of Common Pleas, also known as the Common Bench or Common Place, which was the second-highest common law court in the English legal system until 1875, when it, along with the other two common law courts and the equity and probate courts, became part of the High Court of Justice. As such, the Chief Justice of the Common Pleas was one of the highest judicial officials in England, behind only the Lord High Chancellor and the Lord Chief Justice of England, who headed the Queen's Bench.

Eton College British independent boarding school located in Eton

Eton College is a 13–18 independent boarding school and sixth form for boys in the parish of Eton, near Windsor in Berkshire, England. It was founded in 1440 by King Henry VI as Kynge's College of Our Ladye of Eton besyde Windesore , as a sister institution to King's College, Cambridge, making it the 18th-oldest Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference school.

He served as Groom of the Bedchamber to King George III from 1771 to 1777. His other public posts included Lord of Trade (1777–1781), Under-Secretary of State for the American department (February 1778 – September 1780), Vice-Treasurer of Ireland (1784–1787) and joint Postmaster General (1787–1794).

The Under-Secretary of State for the Colonies was a junior Ministerial post in the United Kingdom government, subordinate to the Secretary of State for the Colonies and, from 1948, also to a Minister of State.

Postmaster General of the United Kingdom

The Postmaster General of the United Kingdom was a Cabinet-level ministerial position in HM Government. Aside from maintaining the postal system, the Telegraph Act of 1868 established the Postmaster General's right to exclusively maintain electric telegraphs. This would subsequently extend to telecommunications and broadcasting.

Political career

Walsingham sat as Member of Parliament for Wareham in 1774, [3] for Tamworth from 1774 to 1780, [4] and for Lostwithiel from 1780 to 1781, [5] when he succeeded his father and took his seat in the House of Lords. In 1783 Lord Walsingham was admitted to the Privy Council, [6] and from 1794 to 1814 was Chairman of Committees in the House of Lords. [2]

Wareham was a parliamentary borough in Dorset, which elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons from 1302 until 1832, and then one member from 1832 until 1885, when the borough was abolished.

Tamworth (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1997 onwards

Tamworth is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2010 by Christopher Pincher, a Conservative.

Lostwithiel was a rotten borough in Cornwall which returned two Members of Parliament to the House of Commons in the English and later British Parliament from 1304 to 1832, when it was abolished by the Great Reform Act.

Family

Lord Walsingham married the Hon. Augusta Georgina Elizabeth Irby, daughter of William Irby, 1st Baron Boston. He died in January 1818, aged 69, and was succeeded in the barony by his eldest son, George. [7]

William Irby, 1st Baron Boston was a British peer and Member of Parliament.

George de Grey, 3rd Baron Walsingham

George de Grey, 3rd Baron Walsingham of Merton Hall, Norfolk was a British peer and Army officer.

Arms

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References

  1. "DE GREY, Thomas (1748-1818), of Merton, Norf". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 25 April 2016.
  2. 1 2 Kidd, Charles, Williamson, David (editors). Debrett's Peerage and Baronetage (1990 edition). New York: St Martin's Press, 1990, [ page needed ]
  3. leighrayment.com House of Commons: Wakefield to Waterford County West
  4. leighrayment.com House of Commons: Tain Burghs to Tipperary North
  5. leighrayment.com House of Commons: London University to Lymington
  6. "No. 12506". The London Gazette . 30 December 1783. p. 1.
  7. Lundy, Darryl. "thepeerage.com Thomas de Grey, 2nd Baron Walsingham". The Peerage.[ unreliable source ]
  8. Debrett's Peerage & Baronetage. 2000.
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Robert Palk
Whitshed Keene
Member of Parliament for Wareham
1774
With: Robert Palk
Succeeded by
William Gerard Hamilton
Christopher D'Oyly
Preceded by
Edward Thurlow
Charles Vernon
Member of Parliament for Tamworth
1774–1780
With: Edward Thurlow 1774–1778
Anthony Chamier 1778–1780
Succeeded by
Anthony Chamier
John Courtenay
Preceded by
Viscount Fairford
Thomas Potter
Member of Parliament for Lostwithiel
1780–1781
With: Hon. John St John 1780
George Johnstone 1780–1781
Succeeded by
George Johnstone
Viscount Malden
Political offices
Preceded by
The Lord Carteret
The Earl of Clarendon
Joint Postmaster General
1787–1794
With: The Lord Carteret 1787–1789
The Earl of Westmorland 1789–1790
The Earl of Chesterfield 1790–1794
Succeeded by
The Earl of Chesterfield
The Earl of Leicester
Peerage of Great Britain
Preceded by
William de Grey
Baron Walsingham
1781–1818
Succeeded by
George de Grey