Thomas de Vere, 8th Earl of Oxford

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Thomas de Vere, 8th Earl of Oxford
The keep, Hedingham Castle in winter.jpg
Hedingham Castle, Essex, seat of the Earls of Oxford
Bornc. 1335
Died12 18 September 1371
Great Bentley, Essex
Noble family De Vere
Spouse(s) Maud de Ufford
Issue
Father John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford
Mother Maud de Badlesmere

Thomas de Vere, 8th Earl of Oxford (c. 1336 – September 1371) was the second son of John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford, and Maud de Badlesmere. He was predeceased by his elder brother, Sir John Vere of Whitchurch, Buckinghamshire, who married Elizabeth de Courtenay, the daughter of Hugh de Courtenay, 10th Earl of Devon, and died before 23 June 1350 without issue. [1]

John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford English noble

John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford was the nephew and heir of Robert de Vere, 6th Earl of Oxford who succeeded as Earl of Oxford in 1331, after his uncle died without issue.

Whitchurch, Buckinghamshire village and civil parish in the Aylesbury Vale district of Buckinghamshire, England

Whitchurch is a village and civil parish in the Aylesbury Vale district of Buckinghamshire, England. The village is on the A413 road about 4 miles (6.4 km) north of Aylesbury and 4.5 miles (7 km) south of Winslow. The 2011 Census recorded a parish population of 932.

Thomas took part in several of the military campaigns of Edward III. He married, Sometime before 10 June 1350, Maud de Ufford, daughter and heir of Sir Ralph de Ufford and Maud of Lancaster, the daughter of Henry of Lancaster, grandson of King Henry III. [1] After Thomas’s death, his widow was indicted for involvement in a plot against King Henry IV, but was later pardoned. When Thomas died in 1371, he was succeeded by his only son, Robert de Vere, 9th Earl of Oxford.

Edward III of England 14th-century King of England and Duke of Aquitaine

Edward III was King of England and Lord of Ireland from January 1327 until his death; he is noted for his military success and for restoring royal authority after the disastrous and unorthodox reign of his father, Edward II. Edward III transformed the Kingdom of England into one of the most formidable military powers in Europe. His long reign of 50 years was the second longest in medieval England and saw vital developments in legislation and government, in particular the evolution of the English parliament, as well as the ravages of the Black Death.

Henry III of England 13th-century King of England and Duke of Aquitaine

Henry III, also known as Henry of Winchester, was King of England, Lord of Ireland, and Duke of Aquitaine from 1216 until his death. The son of King John and Isabella of Angoulême, Henry assumed the throne when he was only nine in the middle of the First Barons' War. Cardinal Guala declared the war against the rebel barons to be a religious crusade and Henry's forces, led by William Marshal, defeated the rebels at the battles of Lincoln and Sandwich in 1217. Henry promised to abide by the Great Charter of 1225, which limited royal power and protected the rights of the major barons. His early rule was dominated first by Hubert de Burgh and then Peter des Roches, who re-established royal authority after the war. In 1230, the King attempted to reconquer the provinces of France that had once belonged to his father, but the invasion was a debacle. A revolt led by William Marshal's son, Richard, broke out in 1232, ending in a peace settlement negotiated by the Church.

Henry IV of England 15th-century King of England

Henry IV, also known as Henry Bolingbroke, was King of England from 1399 to 1413, and asserted the claim of his grandfather, Edward III, to the Kingdom of France.

Footnotes

  1. 1 2 Richardson IV 2011 , p. 268.

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References

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Peerage of England
Preceded by
John de Vere
Earl of Oxford
13601371
Succeeded by
Robert de Vere