Thomas of Jesus

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Thomas of Jesus (Lisbon, 1529 – Sagena, Morocco, April 17, 1582), also known as Tome de Jesus and Tomé de Andrade, was a reformer and preacher, instrumental in creating the Discalced Augustinians. [1]

Lisbon Capital city in Lisbon metropolitan area, Portugal

Lisbon is the capital and the largest city of Portugal, with an estimated population of 505,526 within its administrative limits in an area of 100.05 km2. Lisbon's urban area extends beyond the city's administrative limits with a population of around 2.8 million people, being the 11th-most populous urban area in the European Union. About 3 million people live in the Lisbon metropolitan area, including the Portuguese Riviera. It is mainland Europe's westernmost capital city and the only one along the Atlantic coast. Lisbon lies in the western Iberian Peninsula on the Atlantic Ocean and the River Tagus. The westernmost portions of its metro area form the westernmost point of Continental Europe, which is known as Cabo da Roca, located in the Sintra Mountains.

Morocco Country in North Africa

Morocco, officially the Kingdom of Morocco, is a sovereign state located in the Maghreb region of North Africa. It overlooks the Mediterranean Sea to the north and the Atlantic Ocean to the west. Morocco claims the areas of Ceuta, Melilla and Peñón de Vélez de la Gomera, all of them under Spanish jurisdiction. The capital is Rabat and the largest city Casablanca. Morocco spans an area of 710,850 km2 (274,460 sq mi) and has a population of over 35 million.

The Order of Discalced Augustinians was a reform movement of Roman Catholic religious orders, which occurred as part of the Counterreformation developing in Catholic Europe, also found sympathy among the friars of the Augustinian Order. As the order to which Martin Luther belonged, there was a special interest among them in the theological debates of the day, as well as a need to return to the roots of their way of life.

His main work, Os Trabalhos de Jesus, is a mystical text consisting of contemplations on the sufferings of Jesus. He wrote it while a captive in Morocco. The book was published between 1602 and 1609, and was translated into several languages, including Latin, Spanish, English, and German.

Latin Indo-European language of the Italic family

Latin is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet.

Spanish language Romance language

Spanish or Castilian, is a Romance language that originated in the Iberian Peninsula and today has over 450 million native speakers in Spain and in the Americas. It is a global language and the world's second-most spoken native language, after Mandarin Chinese.

English language West Germanic language

English is a West Germanic language that was first spoken in early medieval England and eventually became a global lingua franca. It is named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to the area of Great Britain that later took their name, as England. Both names derive from Anglia, a peninsula in the Baltic Sea. The language is closely related to Frisian and Low Saxon, and its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse, and to a greater extent by Latin and French.

Father Thomas of Jesus (1568-1582) wrote the Latin treatise De contemplatione divitia libri VI ("Six books on the divine contemplation"), firstly published at Cologne in 1684 [2]

Cologne City in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany

Cologne is the largest city of Germany's most populous federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia and the fourth most populous city in Germany after Berlin, Hamburg, and Munich. With slightly over a million inhabitants within its city boundaries, Cologne is the largest city on the Rhine and also the most populous city both of the Rhine-Ruhr Metropolitan Region, which is Germany's largest and one of Europe's major metropolitan areas, and of the Rhineland. Centered on the left bank of the Rhine, Cologne is about 45 kilometres (28 mi) southeast of North Rhine-Westphalia's capital of Düsseldorf and 25 kilometres (16 mi) northwest of Bonn. It is the largest city in the Central Franconian and Ripuarian dialect areas.

For the Andrada's family he "belonged to one of the most illostrious house of Portugal" [3] . Referring to the King Sebastian's "expedition into Africa in 1578" [3] , he was "mixing with the gay and nobles and soldiery" with the mission "to nurse the sick and tend the wounded", and to prevent imprisoned Christian slaves from the mortal sin of apostasy, being converted or claiming the "Mahometan unbelief".

Sebastian of Portugal King of Portugal

Sebastian was King of Portugal from 11 June 1557 to 4 August 1578 and the penultimate Portuguese monarch of the House of Aviz.

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References

  1. PD-icon.svg Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Thomas of Jesus". Catholic Encyclopedia . New York: Robert Appleton Company.
  2. Adolphe D. Tanquerey (Rev.) (1930). The Spiritual life. A treatise on spiritual and mystical theology. archive.org (2nd ed.). Tournai (BG): Society of St John the Evangelist, Desclée & Co (printers for the Holy See and the Sacred Congr. of Rites). pp. xli (bibliography). Archived from the original on Dec 16, 2018., with the imprimatur of Michael J. Curley, Roman Catholic Archbishop of Baltimore
  3. 1 2 Henry Edward Manning (card.) (1855). Pictures of Christian Heroism. archive.org . London: Burns and Lambert. p. 241-242. Archived from the original on Dec 16, 2018.