Thomasset's Seychelles frog

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Thomasset's Seychelles frog
Scientific classification
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S. thomasseti
Binomial name
Sooglossus thomasseti
(Boulenger, 1909)
Synonyms

Nesomantis thomassetiBoulenger, 1909

Thomasset's Seychelles frog (Sooglossus thomasseti) is a species of frogs in the family Sooglossidae. It is endemic to Seychelles. [2] There are two known populations; one on Silhouette Island and one on Mahé Island.

Frog Member of an order of vertebrates belonging to the amphibians, and comprising largely carnivorous, short-bodied, and tailless animals

A frog is any member of a diverse and largely carnivorous group of short-bodied, tailless amphibians composing the order Anura. The oldest fossil "proto-frog" appeared in the early Triassic of Madagascar, but molecular clock dating suggests their origins may extend further back to the Permian, 265 million years ago. Frogs are widely distributed, ranging from the tropics to subarctic regions, but the greatest concentration of species diversity is in tropical rainforests. There are approximately 4,800 recorded species, accounting for over 85% of extant amphibian species. They are also one of the five most diverse vertebrate orders. Warty frog species tend to be called toads, but the distinction between frogs and toads is informal, not from taxonomy or evolutionary history.

Sooglossidae family of amphibians

The Seychelles frogs (Sooglossidae) are a family of frogs found on the Seychelles Islands and in India. Until recently, this family was believed to include the genera Sechellophryne, Nesomantis and Sooglossus, but following a major revision of amphibians in 2006, the genus Nesomantis was named a junior synonym of Sooglossus. Their closest relatives are the purple frogs (Nasikabatrachidae) of India.

Seychelles island country to the East of Africa

Seychelles, officially the Republic of Seychelles, is an archipelago country in the Indian Ocean. The capital of the 115-island country, Victoria, lies 1,500 kilometres (932 mi) east of mainland East Africa. Other nearby island countries and territories include Comoros, Mayotte, Madagascar, Réunion and Mauritius to the south; as well as the Maldives and British Indian Ocean Territory to the east. With a population of roughly 94,228, it has the smallest population of any sovereign African country.

The natural habitats of this frog are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist montane forests, rivers, and intermittent rivers. Eggs are laid among rocks and hatch into miniature adults, bypassing a larval stage. [1] The species is threatened by habitat loss. [1]

Habitat ecological or environmental area inhabited by a particular species; natural environment in which an organism lives, or the physical environment that surrounds a species population

In ecology, a habitat is the type of natural environment in which a particular species of organism lives. It is characterized by both physical and biological features. A species' habitat is those places where it can find food, shelter, protection and mates for reproduction.

Forest dense collection of trees covering a relatively large area

A forest is a large area dominated by trees. Hundreds of more precise definitions of forest are used throughout the world, incorporating factors such as tree density, tree height, land use, legal standing and ecological function. According to the widely used Food and Agriculture Organization definition, forests covered 4 billion hectares (9.9×109 acres) (15 million square miles) or approximately 30 percent of the world's land area in 2006.

River Natural flowing watercourse

A river is a natural flowing watercourse, usually freshwater, flowing towards an ocean, sea, lake or another river. In some cases a river flows into the ground and becomes dry at the end of its course without reaching another body of water. Small rivers can be referred to using names such as stream, creek, brook, rivulet, and rill. There are no official definitions for the generic term river as applied to geographic features, although in some countries or communities a stream is defined by its size. Many names for small rivers are specific to geographic location; examples are "run" in some parts of the United States, "burn" in Scotland and northeast England, and "beck" in northern England. Sometimes a river is defined as being larger than a creek, but not always: the language is vague.

Genetic analysis indicates that the two populations of this species are distinct from each other and are possibly even separate species. It has thus been proposed that both populations be considered evolutionary significant units for conservation purposes. [3]

An evolutionarily significant unit (ESU) is a population of organisms that is considered distinct for purposes of conservation. Delineating ESUs is important when considering conservation action. This term can apply to any species, subspecies, geographic race, or population. Often the term "species" is used rather than ESU, even when an ESU is more technically considered a subspecies or variety rather than a biological species proper. In marine animals the term "stock" is often used as well.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 Nussbaum, R. & Gerlach, J. (2004). "Sooglossus thomasseti". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2012.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature . Retrieved 25 May 2013.
  2. Frost, Darrel R. (2013). "Sooglossus thomasseti (Boulenger, 1909)". Amphibian Species of the World 5.6, an Online Reference. American Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 25 May 2013.
  3. Groombridge, Jim J.; Taylor, Michelle L.; Bradfield, Kay S.; Maddock, Simon T.; Bunbury, Nancy; Chong-Seng, Lindsay; Griffiths, Richard A.; Labisko, Jim (2019). "Endemic, endangered and evolutionarily significant: cryptic lineages in Seychelles' frogs (Anura: Sooglossidae)" (PDF). Biological Journal of the Linnean Society. 126 (3): 417–435. doi:10.1093/biolinnean/bly183.