Thomaston Historic District

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Thomaston Historic District

Thomaston Academy building, Thomaston, Maine.jpg

Thomaston Academy
USA Maine location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Location Runs through Blue Star Memorial Hwy. (US 1) between Wadsworth St. and ME 131, Thomaston, Maine
Coordinates 44°4′38″N69°10′54″W / 44.07722°N 69.18167°W / 44.07722; -69.18167 Coordinates: 44°4′38″N69°10′54″W / 44.07722°N 69.18167°W / 44.07722; -69.18167
Area 125 acres (51 ha)
Architect Multiple
Architectural style Mid-19th-Century Revival, Italianate, Federal
NRHP reference # 74000176 [1]
Added to NRHP May 2, 1974

The Thomaston Historic District encompasses much of the historic town center of Thomaston, Maine. With a settlement history dating to the 17th century, the town is now a showcase of 19th-century architectural styles up to the 1870s. The district extends for about 2 miles (3.2 km) along United States Route 1, and was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. [1]

Thomaston, Maine Town in Maine, United States

Thomaston is a town in Knox County, Maine, United States. The population was 2,781 at the 2010 census. Noted for its antique architecture, Thomaston is an old port popular with tourists.

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

Contents

Description and history

The town center of Thomaston is located at one of the heads of Muscongus Bay, directly adjacent to the mouth of the Saint George River on Maine's Mid Coast. This area was first explored by Europeans in the early 17th century, and was the site of trading post for Native Americans in 1630. Settlement did not begin on a large scale until the 1730s because of conflicts with the natives, and the town was incorporated in 1777. The production of lime was from an early date an economically significant industry, as were lumbering and shipbuilding. These industries, and the business activities of American Revolutionary War General Henry Knox in the late 18th century, were critical factors in the town's growth. [2]

Muscongus Bay

Muscongus Bay is a bay on the coast of Maine, United States, between Penobscot Bay and John's Bay. Muscongus was the name of an Abenaki village meaning "fishing place" or "many [or large] rock ledges." John Smith recorded the river in 1616 as Nusconcus and was also spelled Nuscongus. The two main tributaries are the Saint George River at its eastern end and the Medomak River, which flows into the bay at Waldoboro. Historically, the Medomak River and Muscongus Bay were the dividing line between the Waldo Patent and Pemaquid Patent and Waldoboro was a customs point of entry. Muscongus Bay has many islands including Hog which is home to a National Audubon Society camp, Allen, Eastern Egg Rock, Franklin, and Louds Island historically referred to as Muscongus Island prior purchase from Thomas Drowne by William Loud. Monhegan Island is offshore from Muscongus Bay. The Maine Island Trail passed through Muscongus Bay.

The Saint George River is a river in Maine with a watershed of 225 square miles (580 km2) in a unique and historic area of mountains, sea coast, lakes, tidal streams and inlets. The origin of the Saint George River is the outflow of Saint George Lake in Liberty. The river follows a winding course 45 miles (72 km) south to Thomaston, where the river flows into the estuary and runs about 12 miles (19 km) southwest to Muscongus Bay, forming the border between Cushing and St. George.

Mid Coast

The Mid Coast is a region of Maine that includes the coastal counties of Lincoln, Knox, Waldo, Sagadahoc, and the northern coastal portion of Cumberland counties. Some of the towns are:

The historic district primarily along United States Route 1 between Kossuth Street and Maine State Route 131, and along Knox Street, which extends south from US 1 to the harbor. The eastern end of the district is anchored by the 1929 reproduction of General Knox's mansion house, the deteriorated original having been razed in the 1860s. The brick commercial buildings found on Main Street date mainly from the late 19th century, although there is one from the 1850s. Houses lining the streets include fine examples of the Federal and Greek Revival styles. The Baptist church was built in 1828, and given late Victorian styling in the 1870s, while the 1868-69 Episcopal church is a fine example wooden Gothic Revival, reminiscent of the designs of Richard Upjohn but actually the work of Portland architect Francis H. Fassett. [2]

Maine State Route 131

State Route 131 (SR 131) is a 58 12-mile-long (94.1 km) state route in the U.S. state of Maine. Its southern terminus is in the St. George community of Port Clyde, at a dead end near the Port Clyde Harbor. Its northern terminus is in Swanville, at the intersection with SR 141.

Richard Upjohn English architect

Richard Upjohn was a British-born American architect who emigrated to the United States and became most famous for his Gothic Revival churches. He was partially responsible for launching the movement to such popularity in the United States. Upjohn also did extensive work in and helped to popularize the Italianate style. He was a founder and the first president of the American Institute of Architects. His son, Richard Michell Upjohn, (1828-1903), was also a well-known architect and served as a partner in his continued architectural firm in New York.

Portland, Maine largest city in Maine

Portland is the most populous city in the U.S. state of Maine, with a population of 67,067 as of 2017. The Greater Portland metropolitan area is home to over half a million people, more than one-third of Maine's total population, making it the most populous metro in northern New England. Portland is Maine's economic center, with an economy that relies on the service sector and tourism. The Old Port district is a popular destination known for its 19th-century architecture and nightlife. Marine industry still plays an important role in the city's economy, with an active waterfront that supports fishing and commercial shipping. The Port of Portland is the largest tonnage seaport in New England.

See also

National Register of Historic Places listings in Knox County, Maine Wikimedia list article

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Knox County, Maine.

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