Thomazeau

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Thomazeau

Tomazo
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Thomazeau
Location in Haiti
Coordinates: 18°39′0″N72°6′0″W / 18.65000°N 72.10000°W / 18.65000; -72.10000 Coordinates: 18°39′0″N72°6′0″W / 18.65000°N 72.10000°W / 18.65000; -72.10000
Country Flag of Haiti.svg Haiti
Department Ouest
Arrondissement Croix-des-Bouquets
Area
  Total293.0 km2 (113.1 sq mi)
Elevation
29 m (95 ft)
Population
 (7 August 2003) [1]
  Total52,017
  Density177.5/km2 (460/sq mi)

Thomazeau (Haitian Creole : Tomazo) is a commune in the Croix-des-Bouquets Arrondissement, Ouest department of Haiti. It has 52,017 inhabitants.

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References

  1. Institut Haïtien de Statistique et d'Informatique (IHSI)