Thompo Icefall

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Thompo Icefall ( 83°18′S50°8′W / 83.300°S 50.133°W / -83.300; -50.133 Coordinates: 83°18′S50°8′W / 83.300°S 50.133°W / -83.300; -50.133 ) is an icefall at the northeast edge of Saratoga Table between Mount Hummer and Mount Hook, in the Forrestal Range, Pensacola Mountains, Antarctica. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) in 1967 from ground surveys and U.S. Navy aerial photographs taken in 1964. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) in 1979 after Robert W. Thompson, photographer of U.S. Navy Squadron VX-6 in the Balleny Islands and Sky-Hi Nunataks areas, 1963–64, and in the Pensacola Mountains, 1964-65. Thompo is a nickname by which he and other family members have been known.

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A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Mount Hummer

Mount Hummer is a snow-covered, bluff-type mountain on the southwest side of the head of Chambers Glacier, northeast Saratoga Table, in the Forrestal Range of the Pensacola Mountains, Antarctica. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names in 1979 after Dr. Michael G. Hummer of the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, who was a researcher in biomedicine and the physician at South Pole Station in the winter of 1975.

Mount Hook

Mount Hook is a mountainous snow-covered projection from the east side of Saratoga Table, 5 nautical miles (9 km) southeast of Sorna Bluff, in the Forrestal Range of the Pensacola Mountains, Antarctica. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names in 1979 after Lieutenant Commander Richard M. Hook of the U.S. Navy, who was a Medical Officer at South Pole Station in the winter of 1968.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Thompo Icefall" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


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Pensacola Mountains

The Pensacola Mountains are a large group of mountain ranges of the Transantarctic Mountains System, located in the Queen Elizabeth Land region of Antarctica,.

Forrestal Range

The Forrestal Range is a largely snow-covered mountain range, about 105 km (65 mi) long, standing east of Dufek Massif and the Neptune Range in the Pensacola Mountains of Antarctica. Discovered and photographed on January 13, 1956 on a transcontinental patrol plane flight of U.S. Navy Operation Deep Freeze I from McMurdo Sound to the vicinity of the Weddell Sea and return.

Neptune Range

The Neptune Range is a mountain range, 112 km (70 mi) long, lying WSW of Forrestal Range in the central part of the Pensacola Mountains in Antarctica. The range is composed of Washington Escarpment with its associated ridges, valleys and peaks, the Iroquois Plateau, and the Schmidt and Williams Hills. It was discovered and photographed on January 13, 1956 on a US Navy transcontinental plane flight from McMurdo Sound to Weddell Sea and return.

Arcondo Nunatak

Arcondo Nunatak is a nunatak, 780 metres (2,560 ft) high, standing 5 miles (8 km) south of Mount Spann in the Panzarini Hills portion of the Argentina Range of the Pensacola Mountains of Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and from U.S. Navy air photos, 1956–67, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Mayor Pedro Arcondo, Argentine officer in charge at Belgrano I Base, 1959–61.

Washington Escarpment

Washington Escarpment is the major west-facing escarpment of the Neptune Range, Pensacola Mountains in Antarctica, extending some 50 miles (80 km) and being the point of origin of a number of west-trending rock ridges. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1956-66. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for the University of Washington at Seattle. Several members of the Neptune Range field party of 1963-64 attended this university.

Barnes Icefalls are the icefalls along Washington Escarpment between Mount Dover and Bennett Spires in the Neptune Range, Pensacola Mountains. They were mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and from U.S. Navy air photos, 1956–66, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for James C. Barnes, meteorologist and station scientific leader at Ellsworth Station, winter 1962.

Chambers Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Chambers Glacier is a glacier in the Forrestal Range of the Pensacola Mountains, draining east from Mount Lechner and Kent Gap, at the juncture of Saratoga Table and Lexington Table, to enter Support Force Glacier. It was discovered and photographed on January 13, 1956 on a transcontinental patrol plane flight of U.S. Navy Operation Deep Freeze I from McMurdo Sound to the vicinity of the Weddell Sea and return. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names after Captain Washington I. Chambers, U.S. Navy, one of the pioneers in the development of the airplane catapult for ships.

Coal Rock is a prominent nunatak lying 4 nautical miles (7 km) southeast of Fierle Peak at the south end of the Forrestal Range, Pensacola Mountains. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and from U.S. Navy air photos, 1956–66, and named by Dwight L. Schmidt, USGS geologist to these mountains, for the Permian coal that is well exposed on the nunatak.

Wall Rock is a rock 4 nautical miles (7 km) north of Robbins Nunatak in the Schmidt Hills portion of the Neptune Range, Pensacola Mountains. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1956-66. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for John Wall, a member of the Electronic Test Unit in the Pensacola Mountains, 1957-58.

Counts Icefall is a steep, heavily crevassed icefall at the juncture of the Ford Massif and the western end of the Bermel Escarpment, in the Thiel Mountains. It was surveyed by the United States Geological Survey Thiel Mountains party, 1960–61, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Lieutenant Commander William D. Counts, U.S. Navy, who lost his life in the crash of a P2V Neptune aircraft soon after take-off from Wilkes Station on November 9, 1961.

Dickson Icefalls are north-draining icefalls of moderate slope at an elevation of 1,800 to 2,000 metres, located between Mount Moulton and Mount Bursey in the Flood Range of Marie Byrd Land. They were mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1959–65, and were named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Donald T. Dickson, a United States Antarctic Research Program glaciologist with the Byrd Station Traverse of 1962–63.

Gale Ridge is a ridge, 12 nautical miles (22 km) long, extending northwestward from Mount Dover in the Neptune Range of the Pensacola Mountains, Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1956–66, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Phillip L. Gale, a meteorologist at Ellsworth Station, winter 1962.

Henderson Bluff is a rock bluff, 1,660 metres (5,450 ft) high, along the west side of Lexington Table 9 nautical miles (17 km) north of Mount Lechner, in the Forrestal Range of the Pensacola Mountains, Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1956–66, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for John R. Henderson, a geophysicist in the Pensacola Mountains, 1965–66.

May Valley is a nearly flat snow-covered valley along the western flank of the Forrestal Range, at the juncture of Lexington Table and Saratoga Table, in the Pensacola Mountains of Antarctica. It was mapped from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1956–66, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Walter H. May, an aerographer at Ellsworth Station, winter 1957.

Madey Ridge is a ridge trending northwest from Mount Moffat along the north side of Berquist Ridge in the Neptune Range, Pensacola Mountains, Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1956–66, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Jules Madey of Clark, New Jersey, a ham radio operator who arranged innumerable phone patches between personnel in Antarctica and parties in the U.S. in the period 1957–67.

Schmidt Hills is a group of rock hills, 15 nautical miles (28 km) long, lying north of Childs Glacier and west of Roderick Valley in the Neptune Range, Pensacola Mountains. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1956-66. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Dwight L. Schmidt, USGS geologist to the Pensacola Mountains in 1962-63, 1963–64 and 1965-66.

Sorna Bluff is a prominent rock bluff on the north side of Saratoga Table, overlooking the head of May Valley in the Forrestal Range, Pensacola Mountains. It was mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1956–66, and named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Lieutenant Commander Ronald E. Sorna, a U.S. Navy pilot on photographic flights in the Pensacola Mountains.

Torbert Escarpment

Torbert Escarpment is an escarpment, 15 nautical miles (28 km) long, marking the west margin of Median Snowfield in the Neptune Range, Pensacola Mountains. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1956-66. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) after Mount Torbert, the salient feature along its edge.

Kelley Spur is a rock spur 2 nautical miles (4 km) east of Spear Spur on the south side of Dufek Massif in the Pensacola Mountains of Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and United States Navy air photos, 1956–66, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Samuel Kelley, a photographer with U.S. Navy Squadron VX-6 on several Operation Deep Freeze deployments between 1964 and 1970.

Robbins Nunatak is a conspicuous nunatak 8 nautical miles (15 km) northeast of Mount Gorecki in the Schmidt Hills portion of the Neptune Range, Pensacola Mountains. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1956–66, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Edward J. Robbins, an aerographer at Ellsworth Station, winter 1958.