Thompson–Campbell Farmstead

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Thompson–Campbell Farmstead
USA Missouri location map.svg
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Nearest city 25579 MO U, near Langdon, Missouri
Coordinates 40°21′30″N95°34′51″W / 40.35833°N 95.58083°W / 40.35833; -95.58083 Coordinates: 40°21′30″N95°34′51″W / 40.35833°N 95.58083°W / 40.35833; -95.58083
Area 12.4 acres (5.0 ha)
Built 1871 (1871)
Architectural style Italianate
NRHP reference # 03001056 [1]
Added to NRHP October 18, 2003

Thompson–Campbell Farmstead, also known as the Philip Austin and Susan Buckham Thompson Farmstead, is a historic home and farm located near Langdon, Atchison County, Missouri. The farmhouse was built in 1871, and is a 2 1/2-story, Italianate style brick dwelling with a two-story rear ell. It features a one-story front porch supported by fluted Doric order columns that replaced an earlier porch in 1905. Also on the property are the contributing icehouse and shed (c. 1900). [2] :5

Langdon, Missouri unincorporated community in Missouri

Langdon is an unincorporated community in Atchison County, Missouri, United States. It is located about six miles southwest of Rock Port. Its post office has closed and mail is now delivered through Fairfax.

Atchison County, Missouri County in the United States

Atchison County is the northwestern-most county in the U.S. state of Missouri. As of the 2010 census, the county had a population of 5,685. Its county seat is Rock Port. It was originally known as Allen County when it was detached from Holt County in 1843. The county was officially organized on February 14, 1845 and named for U.S. Senator David Rice Atchison from Missouri.

Italianate architecture 19th-century phase in the history of Classical architecture

The Italianate style of architecture was a distinct 19th-century phase in the history of Classical architecture.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2003. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. Susan Jezak Ford (March 2003). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form: Thompson–Campbell Farmstead" (PDF). Missouri Department of Natural Resources. Retrieved 2016-09-01.