Thompson Block

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Thompson Block
Thompson Block, Portland, Maine.jpg
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Location 117, 119, 121, 123 and 125 Middle St., Portland, Maine
Coordinates 43°39′32″N70°15′11″W / 43.65889°N 70.25306°W / 43.65889; -70.25306 Coordinates: 43°39′32″N70°15′11″W / 43.65889°N 70.25306°W / 43.65889; -70.25306
Area less than one acre
Built 1867 (1867)
Architect Harding, George M.
Architectural style Late Victorian
Part of Portland Waterfront (#74000353)
NRHP reference # 73000127 [1]
Significant dates
Added to NRHP February 28, 1973
Designated CP May 2, 1974

The Thompson Block is a historic commercial building located at 117, 119, 121, 123 and 125 Middle Street in downtown Portland, Maine. It was designed by architect George M. Harding and constructed in 1867. Along with the neighboring Rackleff and Woodman Buildings (also Harding designs), it forms one of the best-preserved period commercial street views in the entire state. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places on February 28, 1973. [1]

Commercial building building used for commercial use

Commercial buildings are buildings that are used for commercial purposes, and include office buildings, warehouses, and retail buildings. In urban locations, a commercial building may combine functions, such as offices on levels 2-10, with retail on floor 1. When space allocated to multiple functions is significant, these buildings can be called multi-use.

Portland, Maine largest city in Maine

Portland is the most populous city in the U.S. state of Maine, with a population of 67,067 as of 2017. The Greater Portland metropolitan area is home to over half a million people, more than one-third of Maine's total population, making it the most populous metro in northern New England. Portland is Maine's economic center, with an economy that relies on the service sector and tourism. The Old Port district is a popular destination known for its 19th-century architecture and nightlife. Marine industry still plays an important role in the city's economy, with an active waterfront that supports fishing and commercial shipping. The Port of Portland is the largest tonnage seaport in New England.

George M. Harding American architect (1827–1910)

George Milford Harding (1827–1910) was an American architect who practiced in nineteenth-century Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Maine.

Contents

Description and history

The Thompson Block is located in Portland's Old Port area, on the north side of Middle Street. It is flanked on the left side by the Rackleff Building, which stands across Church Street, and by a less ornate brick commercial building on the right, across a narrow alley. It is a 3-1/2 story brick building, roughly trapezoidal in shape, with a polychrome slate mansard roof providing a full fourth floor. The ground floor consists of an arcade of iron supports, forming arches over either display windows or recessed store entries. A stone entablature separates the ground floor from the next two floors. These floors are divided into six bays, articulated in a 1-1-2-1-1 pattern by stone piers, and each floor is also delineated horizontally by rusticated stone beltcourses above and below the windows. Windows on the second floor are paired round-arch windows with keystones, while third-floor windows have segmented-arch tops with stone hoods. Two of these are more ornate, rising into wall dormers that interrupt the bracketed and dentillated cornice. Dormers at the roof level have round-arch windows with keystoned and eared hoods. [2]

The block was built in 1867-68, in the wake of Portland's great 1866 fire. George M. Harding, who designed the Thompson Block and the adjacent Rackleff and Woodman buildings, played a major role in the rebuilding effort, and this trio of buildings represent some of his finest commercial work. Urban renewal of the 20th century resulted in the loss of a significant number of other period buildings, and this is one of the few places in the city where the typical rebuilt post-fire streetscape is to be seen. [2]

See also

National Register of Historic Places listings in Cumberland County, Maine Wikimedia list article

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Cumberland County, Maine.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. 1 2 "NRHP nomination for Thompson Block". National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-03-19.