Thompson Escarpment

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Thompson Escarpment is a steep east-facing escarpment, 8 nautical miles (15 km) long, located at the head of Flanagan Glacier in the Pioneer Heights, Heritage Range. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos. 1961-66. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Commander Robert C. Thompson, Operations Officer of U.S. Navy Squadron VX-6 during Deep Freeze 1965.

Flanagan Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Flanagan Glacier is a glacier in the Pioneer Heights of the Heritage Range, Antarctica, draining east from Thompson Escarpment between the Gross Hills and the Nimbus Hills to the confluent ice at the lower end of Union Glacier. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1961–66, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Lieutenant Walter B. Flanagan, an assistant maintenance officer with U.S. Navy Squadron VX-6 at McMurdo Station during Operation Deep Freeze 1963 and 1964.

Pioneer Heights is a group name in the Heritage Range, Ellsworth Mountains, encompassing the large area of hills, ridges and peaks located eastward of Schneider and Schanz Glaciers and between Splettstoesser and Union Glaciers. Among these features are the Inferno Ridge, the Nimbus Hills, Gross, Buchanan and Collier Hills. The Pioneer Heights were mapped by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) from ground surveys and U.S. Navy air photos from 1961-66. The name was applied by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) in association with the name Heritage Range.

Heritage Range mountain range

The Heritage Range is a major mountain range, 160 km (99 mi) long and 48 km (30 mi) wide, situated southward of Minnesota Glacier and forming the southern half of the Ellsworth Mountains in Antarctica. The range is complex, consisting of scattered ridges and peaks of moderate height, escarpments, hills and nunataks, with the various units of relief set off by numerous intervening glaciers.

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Queen Elizabeth Range (Antarctica) mountain range in Antarctica

The Queen Elizabeth Range is a rugged mountain range of the Transantarctic Mountains System, located in the Ross Dependency region of Antarctica.

Forrestal Range

The Forrestal Range is a largely snow-covered mountain range, about 105 km (65 mi) long, standing east of Dufek Massif and the Neptune Range in the Pensacola Mountains of Antarctica. Discovered and photographed on January 13, 1956 on a transcontinental patrol plane flight of U.S. Navy Operation Deep Freeze I from McMurdo Sound to the vicinity of the Weddell Sea and return.

Neptune Range

The Neptune Range is a mountain range, 112 km (70 mi) long, lying WSW of Forrestal Range in the central part of the Pensacola Mountains in Antarctica. The range is composed of Washington Escarpment with its associated ridges, valleys and peaks, the Iroquois Plateau, and the Schmidt and Williams Hills. It was discovered and photographed on January 13, 1956 on a US Navy transcontinental plane flight from McMurdo Sound to Weddell Sea and return.

Washington Escarpment

Washington Escarpment is the major west-facing escarpment of the Neptune Range, Pensacola Mountains in Antarctica, extending some 50 miles (80 km) and being the point of origin of a number of west-trending rock ridges. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1956-66. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for the University of Washington at Seattle. Several members of the Neptune Range field party of 1963-64 attended this university.

Balish Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Balish Glacier is a glacier, 18 nautical miles (33 km) long, flowing north from the Soholt Peaks to enter Splettstoesser Glacier just northeast of Springer Peak, in the Heritage Range, Ellsworth Mountains. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and from U.S. Navy air photos, 1961–66, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Commander Daniel Balish, Executive Officer of U.S. Navy Squadron VX-6 during Operation Deep Freeze 1965, and Commanding Officer in 1967.

Watson Escarpment

Watson Escarpment is a major escarpment in the Queen Maud Mountains, trending northward along the east margin of Scott Glacier, then eastward to Reedy Glacier where it turns southward along the glacier's west side. Somewhat arcuate, the escarpment is nearly 100 nautical miles (180 km) long, rises 3,550 m above sea level, and 1,000 to 1,500 m above the adjacent terrain.

Johns Glacier is an arc-shaped glacier 8 nautical miles (15 km) long in the northern part of the Watson Escarpment in Antarctica. It drains eastward around the northern side of Mount Doumani to join the Kansas Glacier. The glacier was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy aerial photographs, 1960–63, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Lieutenant Ernest H. Johns, U.S. Navy, a participant in several deployments of Operation Deep Freeze, 1955–68.

Gowan Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Gowan Glacier is a glacier about 15 nautical miles long in the Heritage Range of the Ellsworth Mountains of Antarctica, flowing north from the vicinity of Cunningham Peak in the Founders Escarpment to enter Minnesota Glacier just east of Welcome Nunatak. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1961–66, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Lieutenant Jimmy L. Gowan, U.S. Navy Medical Corps, officer in charge and doctor at Plateau Station in 1966.

Plummer Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Plummer Glacier is a short glacier descending east through the Enterprise Hills to the north of Lippert Peak and the Douglas Peaks, in the Heritage Range in Antarctica. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1961-66. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Charles C. Plummer, United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) glaciologist at Palmer Station in 1965.

Driscoll Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Driscoll Glacier is a glacier 13 nautical miles (24 km) long in the Heritage Range, draining southeast between the Collier Hills and the Buchanan Hills to enter Union Glacier. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1961–66, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Commander Jerome M. Driscoll, an administration officer with U.S. Navy Squadron VX-6 during Operation Deep Freeze 1965.

Fendorf Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Fendorf Glacier is a broad glacier draining from the eastern slopes of the Gifford Peaks and flowing north to merge with Dobbratz Glacier, in the Heritage Range of the Ellsworth Mountains, Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from ground surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1961–66, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Lieutenant Commander James E. Fendorf, U.S. Navy, a pilot with Squadron VX-6 during Operation Deep Freeze 1966.

Median Snowfield is a large snowfield in the Pensacola Mountains of Antarctica, between the Torbert Escarpment, in the Neptune Range, and the southern part of the Forrestal Range. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1956–66, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names reflect its position between the Neptune and Forrestal Ranges.

Hodge Escarpment

Hodge Escarpment is an escarpment to the northeast of Henderson Bluff on the northwest side of Lexington Table, in the Forrestal Range of the Pensacola Mountains, Antarctica. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Steven M. Hodge, a United States Geological Survey geophysicist, who worked in the Dufek Massif and the Forrestal Range, 1978–79.

Hyde Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Hyde Glacier is a short glacier flowing east through the Edson Hills to join Union Glacier, in the Heritage Range, Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1961–66, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for William H. Hyde, an ionospheric scientist at Little America V Station in 1958.

Schanz Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Schanz Glacier is a glacier 8 nautical miles long in the Heritage Range, draining south between Soholt Peaks and Collier Hills to enter Union Glacier. It was mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos in 1961 to 1966. It was named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Lieutenant Commander Thomas L. Schanz, supply officer with U.S. Navy Squadron VX-6 during Deep Freeze in 1965.

Thompson Nunataks are three evenly spaced nunataks which lie 4 nautical miles (7 km) south of Navigator Peak and surmount the central part of White Escarpment in the Heritage Range, Ellsworth Mountains. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1961-66. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Russel W. Thompson, United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) meteorologist at Wilkes Station, 1963.

Torbert Escarpment

Torbert Escarpment is an escarpment, 15 nautical miles (28 km) long, marking the west margin of Median Snowfield in the Neptune Range, Pensacola Mountains. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1956-66. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) after Mount Torbert, the salient feature along its edge.

Schmidt Glacier (Antarctica)

Schmidt Glacier is a glacier, 20 nautical miles long, in the Pioneer Heights of the Heritage Range, Ellsworth Mountains in Antarctica. The glacier originates near Hall Peak and drains north along the west side of Thompson Escarpment and Gross Hills to coalesce with the lower part of Splettstoesser Glacier, north of Mount Virginia. It was named by the University of Minnesota Ellsworth Mountains Party, 1961-62, for Paul G. Schmidt, geologist with the party.

References

    PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Thompson Escarpment" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

    United States Geological Survey scientific agency of the United States government

    The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

    Geographic Names Information System geographical database

    The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.

    Coordinates: 79°27′S83°30′W / 79.450°S 83.500°W / -79.450; -83.500

    Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

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