Thompson Green

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Thompson Green (26 January 1861 1 July 1945) was an Australian politician who represented the South Australian House of Assembly multi-member seats of Port Adelaide from 1910 to 1915 and West Torrens from 1915 to 1918. He was a member of the United Labor Party until 1917, when he left to join the National Party in the 1917 Labor split. [1]

South Australian House of Assembly lower house of the Parliament of South Australia

The House of Assembly, or lower house, is one of the two chambers of the Parliament of South Australia. The other is the Legislative Council. It sits in Parliament House in the state capital, Adelaide.

Electoral district of Port Adelaide state electoral district of South Australia

Port Adelaide is a single-member electoral district for the South Australian House of Assembly. Named after Port Adelaide, which it surrounds, it is a 118.8 km² suburban and industrial electorate on Adelaide's Lefevre Peninsula, and stretches east toward Adelaide's northern suburbs. It contains a mix of seaside residential areas, wasteland and industrial regions. In addition to its namesake suburb of Port Adelaide, the district includes the suburbs of Birkenhead, Bolivar, Cavan, Dry Creek, Ethelton, Exeter, Garden Island, Gepps Cross, Gillman, Glanville, Globe Derby Park, Largs Bay, Largs North, New Port, North Haven, Osborne, Ottoway, Outer Harbor, Peterhead, Semaphore, Semaphore South, St Kilda, Taperoo, Torrens Island, Wingfield, as well as part of Rosewater.

Electoral district of West Torrens state electoral district of South Australia

West Torrens is a single-member electoral district for the South Australian House of Assembly. Named after the City of West Torrens, it is a 25.1 km² suburban electorate in Adelaide's west. It includes the suburbs and areas of Brooklyn Park, Cowandilla, Flinders Park, Hilton, Hindmarsh, Keswick Terminal, Marleston, Mile End, Mile End South, Netley, Richmond, Thebarton, Torrensville, Underdale and West Richmond, as well as parts of Allenby Gardens, Lockleys, Welland and West Hindmarsh.

Green was born in Glasgow. He went to work at the age of ten, and apprenticed as a boilermaker. He migrated to Sydney in 1886, and subsequently spent time in Melbourne and in Tasmania. Green was involved in the 1890 Australian maritime dispute, after which a number of employers refused to employ him due to his prominent role. He left Melbourne for Adelaide in 1891 and faced continuing problems with being barred from employment due to his union activities, but was hired as a boilermaker at Islington Railway Workshops from 1895 until his election to parliament in 1910. He was heavily involved in union activities, serving as secretary of the state Boilermakers' Society for twenty years, president of the Trades and Labour Council, the inaugural president of the Federated Boilermakers' Society of Australia, and president of the Federated Amalgamated Railway and Tramway Association. He was also president of the Eight Hours Committee, the Adelaide Trades Hall management committee and the Iron Trades Council. In local politics, Green was elected mayor of the Corporate Town of Thebarton. [2] [3] [4]

Glasgow City and council area in Scotland

Glasgow is the most populous city in Scotland, and the third most populous city in the United Kingdom, as of the 2017 estimated city population of 621,020. Historically part of Lanarkshire, the city now forms the Glasgow City council area, one of the 32 council areas of Scotland; the local authority is Glasgow City Council. Glasgow is situated on the River Clyde in the country's West Central Lowlands. Inhabitants of the city are referred to as "Glaswegians" or "Weegies". It is the fourth most visited city in the UK. Glasgow is also known for the Glasgow patter, a distinct dialect of the Scots language that is noted for being difficult to understand by those from outside the city.

Sydney City in New South Wales, Australia

Sydney is the state capital of New South Wales and the most populous city in Australia and Oceania. Located on Australia's east coast, the metropolis surrounds Port Jackson and extends about 70 km (43.5 mi) on its periphery towards the Blue Mountains to the west, Hawkesbury to the north, the Royal National Park to the south and Macarthur to the south-west. Sydney is made up of 658 suburbs, 40 local government areas and 15 contiguous regions. Residents of the city are known as "Sydneysiders". As of June 2017, Sydney's estimated metropolitan population was 5,131,326, and is home to approximately 65% of the state's population.

Melbourne City in Victoria, Australia

Melbourne is the capital and most populous city of the Australian state of Victoria, and the second most populous city in Australia and Oceania. Its name refers to an urban agglomeration of 9,992.5 km2 (3,858.1 sq mi), comprising a metropolitan area with 31 municipalities, and is also the common name for its city centre. The city occupies much of the coastline of Port Phillip bay and spreads into the hinterlands towards the Dandenong and Macedon ranges, Mornington Peninsula and Yarra Valley. It has a population of approximately 4.9 million, and its inhabitants are referred to as "Melburnians".

He was elected to the House of Assembly at the 1910 election for the seat of Port Adelaide, and switched to the new seat of West Torrens following an electoral redistribution in 1915. [2] [5] Green left the Labor Party for the new National Party in the 1917 Labor split over conscription. [6] The Thebarton branch of the Labor Party had already declined to re-endorse him for Thebarton mayor in October 1916 as a result of his support for conscription. [7] Green was defeated by a Labor candidate when he ran for re-election at the 1918 state election. [8]

The National Party was a political party active in South Australia from 1917 to 1923, similar to the federal National Labor Party. It was created in the wake of the 1917 Australian Labor Party split over conscription along the same lines that occurred federally with the Nationalist Party of Australia, following the February 1917 expulsion from the South Australian Labor Party of sitting Premier Crawford Vaughan and his supporters. It was initially known as the National Labor Party like their federal counterpart, but was renamed at a conference in June 1917. The party initially continued on in government under Vaughan, but was subsequently defeated in parliament in July 1917, and thereafter served as the junior partner in a coalition with the Liberal Union under Archibald Peake.

The Australian Labor Party split of 1916 occurred following severe disagreement within the Australian Labor Party over the issue of proposed World War I conscription in Australia. Labor Prime Minister of Australia Billy Hughes had, by 1916, become an enthusiastic supporter of conscription as a means to boost Australia's contribution to the war effort. On 30 August 1916, he announced plans for a referendum on the issue, and introduced enabling legislation into parliament on 14 September, which passed only with the support of the opposition. Six of Hughes' ministers resigned in protest at the move, and the New South Wales state branch of the Labor Party expelled Hughes. The referendum saw an intense campaign in which Labor figures vehemently advocated on each side of the argument, although the "no" campaign narrowly won on 14 November. In the wake of the referendum defeat, the caucus moved to expel Hughes on 14 November; instead, he and 23 supporters resigned and formed the National Labor Party. Frank Tudor was elected leader of the rump party. Hughes was recommissioned as Prime Minister, heading a minority government supported by the opposition Commonwealth Liberal Party; the two parties then merged as the Nationalist Party of Australia and won the 1917 federal election. The Nationalist Party served as the main conservative party of Australia until 1931, and the split resulted in many early Labor figures ending their careers on the political right.

Following his parliamentary defeat, Green was appointed Inspector of Bridges by the Butler government. [9]

Richard Layton Butler Australian politician

Sir Richard Layton Butler KCMG was the 31st Premier of South Australia, serving two disjunct terms in office: from 1927 to 1930, and again from 1933 to 1938.

Green died at the home of his daughter at Erindale in 1945 at the age of 84. [2]

Erindale, South Australia Suburb of Adelaide, South Australia

Erindale is a suburb of Adelaide in the City of Burnside. It is on the east side of Glynburn Road, where it borders Leabrook.

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References

  1. Thompson Green: SA Parliament
  2. 1 2 3 "MR. THOMPSON GREEN DEAD". The Chronicle . 88, (4985). South Australia. 5 July 1945. p. 30. Retrieved 2 August 2016 via National Library of Australia.
  3. "MR. THOMPSON GREEK, M.P. (Port Adelaide)." The Register . LXXV, (19,780). South Australia. 5 April 1910. p. 11. Retrieved 2 August 2016 via National Library of Australia.
  4. "MR. THOMPSON GREEN". Daily Herald . 2, (592). South Australia. 27 January 1912. p. 7. Retrieved 2 August 2016 via National Library of Australia.
  5. "THE STATE ELECTIONS". The Advertiser . LVII, (17,600). South Australia. 13 March 1915. p. 17. Retrieved 2 August 2016 via National Library of Australia.
  6. "THE LABOR SPLIT". The Advertiser . LIX, (18,201). South Australia. 13 February 1917. p. 7. Retrieved 1 August 2016 via National Library of Australia.
  7. "DISSENSIONS IN THE LABOR PARTY". The Advertiser . LIX, (18,106). South Australia. 24 October 1916. p. 6. Retrieved 2 August 2016 via National Library of Australia.
  8. "SOUTH AUSTRALIAN ELECTIONS". The Catholic Press (1163). New South Wales, Australia. 11 April 1918. p. 27. Retrieved 1 August 2016 via National Library of Australia.
  9. "MB. THOMPSON GREEN'S POSITION". Daily Herald . 9, (2652). South Australia. 19 September 1918. p. 4. Retrieved 2 August 2016 via National Library of Australia.