Thompson Hill Historic District

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Thompson Hill Historic District

Ellen Larned Memorial Library, Thompson, CT.jpg

Ellen Larned Memorial Library
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Location Chase & Quaddick Rds., CT 193 & CT 200, Thompson, Connecticut
Coordinates 41°57′27″N71°52′6″W / 41.95750°N 71.86833°W / 41.95750; -71.86833 Coordinates: 41°57′27″N71°52′6″W / 41.95750°N 71.86833°W / 41.95750; -71.86833
Area 550 acres (220 ha)
Architect Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge; Et al.
Architectural style Colonial Revival, Greek Revival, Federal
NRHP reference # 87002186 [1]
Added to NRHP December 31, 1987

The Thompson Hill Historic District encompasses the historic village center of Thompson, Connecticut. The district covers 550 acres (220 ha), whose central focus is the Thompson Center Green, laid out when the town was established in 1735. Thompson Hill was the town's early civic and economic center, later supplanted by industrial villages, and retains well-preserved architecture from the 18th and early 19th centuries. The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1987. [1]

Thompson, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Thompson is a rural town in Windham County, Connecticut, United States. The town was named after Sir Robert Thompson, an English landholder. The population was 9,458 at the 2010 census. Thompson is located in the northeastern corner of the state and is bordered on the north by Webster, Massachusetts and Dudley, Massachusetts, on the east by Douglas, Massachusetts and Burrillville, Rhode Island, on the west by Woodstock, Connecticut, and on the south by Putnam, Connecticut.

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

Contents

Description and history

Thompson was settled about 1700 as part of Killingly, and was separately incorporated in 1785. An early tavern stood on Thompson Hill by 1716, serving travelers on what was then the main road to Providence, Rhode Island. In 1730 its residents petitioned the colonial assembly to establish a separate parish, which was granted. Its first meeting house was built in 1735 in this area. In 1797, Thompson Hill benefited from the creation of turnpikes which intersected here (now Routes 193 and 200), spurring additional development and traffic. The area prospered until 1850, when the railroads bypassed the village. The town's economic focus passed to its mill villages, effectively ending significant development at Thompson Hill. It saw a brief revival in the early 20th century, with the establishment of country estates nearby, drawn by the charm of the village. [2]

Killingly, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Killingly is a town in Windham County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 17,370 at the 2010 census. It consists of the borough of Danielson and the villages of Attawaugan, Ballouville, Dayville, East Killingly, Rogers, and South Killingly.

Providence, Rhode Island capital of Rhode Island

Providence is the capital and most populous city of the U.S. state of Rhode Island and is one of the oldest cities in the United States. It was founded in 1636 by Roger Williams, a Reformed Baptist theologian and religious exile from the Massachusetts Bay Colony. He named the area in honor of "God's merciful Providence" which he believed was responsible for revealing such a haven for him and his followers. The city is situated at the mouth of the Providence River at the head of Narragansett Bay.

Colonial meeting house

A colonial meeting house was a meeting house used in colonial New England built using tax money. The colonial meeting house was the focal point of the community where all the town's residents could discuss local issues, conduct religious worship, and engage in town business.

The historic district is 550 acres (220 ha) in size, and includes more than 100 historically significant buildings. It includes The Cottage House, a historic bed and breakfast, as well as the Thompson Congregational Church, the original Thompson Meeting Hall (known colloquially as "The Old Town Hall"), the Ellen Larned Museum, and several other historic houses built during the early-to-mid 19th century. It is also the site of the former country estate of Norman B. Ream, which is now home to the Marianapolis Preparatory School]]; its grounds were designed by the Olmsted Brothers firm. [2]

The Cottage House, formerly known as the White Horse Inn and Vernon Stiles Inn, is a historic bed and breakfast located in Thompson, Connecticut, United States.

Bed and breakfast small lodging establishment

A bed and breakfast is a small lodging establishment that offers overnight accommodation and breakfast. Bed and breakfasts are often private family homes and typically have between four and eleven rooms, with six being the average. In addition, a B&B usually has the hosts living in the house.

Norman B. Ream

Norman B. Ream (1844-1915) was an American businessman. A Civil War veteran, Ream became a millionaire by investing in steel, railroads, insurance, and banking.

The church and other buildings adjacent to the green. ThompsonCT ThompsonHillHD 1.jpg
The church and other buildings adjacent to the green.

See also

National Register of Historic Places listings in Windham County, Connecticut Wikimedia list article

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Windham County, Connecticut.

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