Thompson House (Stevens Creek, Arkansas)

Last updated
Thompson House
USA Arkansas location map.svg
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Nearest city Stevens Creek, Arkansas
Coordinates 35°23′8″N91°37′52″W / 35.38556°N 91.63111°W / 35.38556; -91.63111 Coordinates: 35°23′8″N91°37′52″W / 35.38556°N 91.63111°W / 35.38556; -91.63111
Area less than one acre
Built 1890 (1890)
Architectural style Vernacular ell-shaped
MPS White County MPS
NRHP reference # 91001341 [1]
Added to NRHP July 23, 1992

The Thompson House is a historic house in rural northern White County, Arkansas. It is located about 1,500 feet (460 m) west of Holly Grove Cemetery, which is located on County Road 328 (Fredonia Road) north of Bald Knob. The house is a vernacular single story ell-shaped wood frame structure, with a gabled roof, weatherboard siding, and a foundation of stone piers. Built about 1890, it is one of the few houses in White County to survive from that time, and was reported to be in declining condition when it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1992. [2]

White County, Arkansas County in the United States

White County is a county located in the U.S. state of Arkansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 77,076. The county seat is Searcy. White County is Arkansas's 31st county, formed on October 23, 1835, from portions of Independence, Jackson, and Pulaski counties and named for Hugh Lawson White, a Whig candidate for President of the United States. It is an alcohol prohibition or dry county, though a few private establishments can serve alcohol.

Bald Knob, Arkansas City in Arkansas, United States

Bald Knob is a city in White County, Arkansas, United States. The population was 2,897 at the 2010 census. Located at the intersection of two of the state's natural regions, Bald Knob is often promoted as "where the Ozarks meet the Delta". Bald Knob is also a leading strawberry producer in the state, known for its yearly Strawberry Fest held during Mother's Day weekend. It was once known as the leading strawberry producer in the world. Bald Knob was established in 1881.

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

See also

National Register of Historic Places listings in White County, Arkansas Wikimedia list article

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in White County, Arkansas.

Related Research Articles

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J.C. Rhew Co. Packing Shed

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Burnett House (Searcy, Arkansas)

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Joe Brown House and Farmstead

The Joe Brown House and Farmstead is a historic property in rural White County, Arkansas. It is located about one mile south of the end of County Road 529, and about 2 miles (3.2 km) north of the hamlet of Little Red as the crow flies. It is a single-story dogtrot house, with a corrugated metal roof and board-and-batten siding. The front facade has a shed-roof porch extending across part of the front, sheltering two entrances giving access to the two pens and the breezeway. The property includes a well and the remains of a log smokehouse. The house was built about 1890, and is one of White County's few surviving 19th-century dogtrots.

Chandler House (Stevens Creek, Arkansas)

The Chandler House is a historic house in rural northern White County, Arkansas. It is located just north of the junction of Stanley and Honeysuckle Roads, northwest of Bald Knob. It is a two-story wood frame structure, with weatherboard siding and a gable roof. A hip-roofed porch extends around its front to the side, supported by square posts, and a shed-roof addition extends to the rear. The front is symmetrically arranged, three bays wide, with sash windows on either side of the entrance, and a third window in the gable above. The house was built about 1885, and is probably one of the first gable-entry houses to be built in White County, and one of a very few to survive from the 19th century.

Cremane House

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Joe Emmer House

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Milt Gooden House

The Milt Gooden House was a historic house in rural White County, Arkansas. It was located on the west side of County Road 83, about 0.5 miles (0.80 km) south of its junction with County Road 205, southeast of Bald Knob. It was a single-story double-pen structure, built out of wood framing, and was finished with a side gable roof and board-and-batten siding. A porch extended across its front (eastern) facade, supported by simple square posts. The house was built about 1921, and was a well-preserved example of period vernacular architecture.

Gray-Kincaid House

The Gray-Kincaid House is a historic house in rural White County, Arkansas. It is located about 0.5 miles (0.80 km) southeast of the junction of County Roads 46 and 759, northeast of the small community of Crosby and northwest of Searcy. It is a single-story wood-frame structure, with a side gable roof and board and batten siding. A shed-roof extension extends across the southern facade, while the principal (north-facing) facade has an entry near its center and four sash windows. A stone chimney rises from the eastern end. The house was built as a traditional dogtrot in about 1910, with an attached rear ell, but the latter was destroyed in a storm in the 1940s, and the dogtrot breezeway has been enclosed, transforming the house into center-hall plan structure.

Roy Harper House

The Roy Harper House is a historic house in rural western White County, Arkansas. It is located about 3.5 miles (5.6 km) south of the hamlet of Romance, on the north side of County Road 16, 0.5 miles (0.80 km) west of its junction with County Road 24. It is a single-story wood box-frame structure, with a gable roof and a stone pier foundation. It has a porch extending across the front, noted for its turned posts and brackets. The house was built c. 1912, and is one of few surviving buildings in the county from this period to use box-frame construction.

Thomas Hunt House

The Thomas Hunt House was a historic house in rural White County, Arkansas. It was located north of Plainview, on the east side of Arkansas Highway 157, just south of County Road 704. It was a single-story wood frame double-pen structure, with a gabled roof and a projecting front gable with a wraparound porch supported by chamfered posts. Built about 1885, it was a rare surviving example of the double-pen frame form, prior to its destruction by fire in 2015.

Emmett McDonald House

The Emmett McDonald House is a historic house in rural White County, Arkansas. It is located southeast of McRae, east of the junction of South Grand Avenue and Gammill Road. It is a 1-1/2 story vernacular wood frame structure, with a tall gabled roof and novelty siding. A gabled porch extends across the front, supported by box columns on brick piers. It was built about 1935, and is one of the few surviving houses from that time period in the county.

Howard ONeal Barn

The Howard O'Neal Barn was a historic barn near Russell, Arkansas. It was located southeast of the city off Roetzel Road. It was a two-story wood frame structure, with a gambrel roof. In layout it has a transverse crib plan, and was designed to house equipment, farm animals, and feed. Built about 1938, it was a good example of a period barn in White County.

Prince House

The Prince House is a historic house in rural northern White County, Arkansas. It is located on the west side of County Road 68, about 0.25 miles (0.40 km) south of County Road 350, roughly 2 miles (3.2 km) north of Velvet Ridge. It is a single story wood frame structure, with a double-pen plan topped by a gable roof that transitions into a shed-roof over the front porch. The porch is supported by wooden posts, and has separate entrances to each pen. Built about 1920, it is one of the modest number of box-frame houses in the county to survive from that period.

Scott-Davis House

The Scott-Davis House is a historic house in rural White County, Arkansas. It is located south of the small community of Romance, on the south side of Blackjack Mountain Road, west of its junction with Wayne Walker Road. In appearance it is a 1-1/2 story double pile structure, with a gabled and hipped roof, and a brick foundation. At its core is a dogtrot built out of logs c. 1869, which was extended to achieve its present appearance in 1905.

Thomas House (Fourmile Hill, Arkansas)

The Thomas House is a historic house in rural White County, Arkansas. It is located northwest of Searcy, set well back on the west side of Baugh Road between Panther Creek and Smith Roads, sheltered by a copse of trees. It is a single story wood frame structure, with T-shaped plan topped by a gabled roof, an exterior of novelty siding, and a foundation of brick piers. A porch extends across part of its east side, its shed roof supported by square posts. It was built about 1905, and is one of the county's best-preserved rural houses of the period.

Walker Homestead Historic District

The Walker Homestead Historic District encompasses a collection of related agricultural and homesteading properties in rural White County, Arkansas. Located on Gum Spring Road about 1 mile (1.6 km) east of Arkansas Highway 267 southwest of Searcy, the district includes two farmstead houses, a barn, tenant housing, cotton gin, and other features. The oldest portion of the oldest house is a single pen log structure built about 1850 by William Walker, one of the area's early settlers, while the other house is a c. 1900 vernacular Greek Revival structure built by Billy Walker, Sr. The district encapsulates a typical evolutionary history of rural properties in the region, and was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1992.

Tom Watkins House

The Tom Watkins House is a historic house at Oak and Race Streets in Searcy, Arkansas. It is a two-story brick structure, with a cross-gabled tile roof and a concrete foundation. A porch extends across part of the front and beyond the left side, forming a carport. The main roof and porch roof both feature exposed rafter tails in the Craftsman style, and there are small triangular brackets in the gable ends. The house, a fine local example of Craftsman architecture, was built about 1920 to a design by Charles L. Thompson.

References

  1. National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. "NRHP nomination for Thompson House" (PDF). Arkansas Preservation. Retrieved 2016-01-27.