Thompson Mountain

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Thompson Mountain ( 81°50′S159°48′E / 81.833°S 159.800°E / -81.833; 159.800 Coordinates: 81°50′S159°48′E / 81.833°S 159.800°E / -81.833; 159.800 ) is a mountain in Antarctica, 2,350 m, standing 5 nautical miles (9 km) south of Mount McKerrow in the southwest part of Surveyors Range. Named by the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZGSAE) (1960–61) for Edgar H. Thompson, Professor of Surveying and Photogrammetry at the University College of London, England.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Mountain A large landform that rises fairly steeply above the surrounding land over a limited area

A mountain is a large landform that rises above the surrounding land in a limited area, usually in the form of a peak. A mountain is generally steeper than a hill. Mountains are formed through tectonic forces or volcanism. These forces can locally raise the surface of the earth. Mountains erode slowly through the action of rivers, weather conditions, and glaciers. A few mountains are isolated summits, but most occur in huge mountain ranges.

Antarctica Polar continent in the Earths southern hemisphere

Antarctica is Earth's southernmost continent. It contains the geographic South Pole and is situated in the Antarctic region of the Southern Hemisphere, almost entirely south of the Antarctic Circle, and is surrounded by the Southern Ocean. At 14,000,000 square kilometres, it is the fifth-largest continent. For comparison, Antarctica is nearly twice the size of Australia. About 98% of Antarctica is covered by ice that averages 1.9 km in thickness, which extends to all but the northernmost reaches of the Antarctic Peninsula.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Thompson Mountain" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


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Queen Elizabeth Range (Antarctica) mountain range in Antarctica

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Usarp Mountains

The Usarp Mountains is a major Antarctic mountain range, lying westward of the Rennick Glacier and trending N-S for about 190 kilometres (118 mi). The feature is bounded to the north by Pryor Glacier and the Wilson Hills. Its important constituent parts include Welcome Mountain, Mount Van der Hoeven, Mount Weihaupt, Mount Stuart, Mount Lorius, Smith Bench, Mount Roberts, Pomerantz Tableland, Daniels Range, Emlen Peaks, Helliwell Hills and Morozumi Range.

Wilson Hills is a group of scattered hills, nunataks and ridges that extend NW-SE for about 110 kilometres (68 mi) between Matusevich Glacier and Pryor Glacier in Antarctica. They were discovered by Lieutenant Harry Pennell, Royal Navy, on the Terra Nova Expedition in February 1911 during Robert Falcon Scott's last expedition, and named after Dr. Edward A. Wilson, a zoologist with the expedition, who perished with Scott on the return journey from the South Pole.

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Balch Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Balch Glacier is a glacier 9 nautical miles (17 km) long, on the east coast of Graham Land, flowing southeast into Mill Inlet, to the south of Gould Glacier. It was first surveyed by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey in 1946–47, and named "East Balch Glacier". With "West Balch Glacier" it was reported to fill a transverse depression across Graham Land, but further survey in 1957 showed that there is no close topographical alignment between the two. The name "Balch", for Edwin S. Balch, an American Antarctic historian, has been limited to this glacier and an entirely new name, Drummond Glacier, approved for the west glacier.

Big Brother Bluff is a high, angular granite bluff, 2,840 metres (9,320 ft) high, along the west wall of Daniels Range, 6 nautical miles (11 km) north of Mount Burnham, in the Usarp Mountains. It was so named by the northern party of the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition, 1963–64, because it is visible from 50 nautical miles (90 km) north and from many points across Rennick Glacier. Hence the reminiscence from George Orwell's famous saying from Nineteen Eighty-Four, "Big Brother is watching you".

Carlyon Glacier is a large glacier which flows east-southeast from the névé east of Mill Mountain to the Ross Ice Shelf at Cape Murray. It was mapped in 1958 by the Darwin Glacier party of the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition (1956–58), and named by the New Zealand Antarctic Place-Names Committee for R.A. Carlyon, who with H.H. Ayres made up the party.

Mount Nero is a mountain surmounting the west wall of Daniels Range 3 nautical miles (6 km) north of Forsythe Bluff, in the Usarp Mountains. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960-63. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Leonard L. Nero, United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) research assistant to Dr. J. S. Zaneveld and lead diver for the first planned winter diving expedition in 1967 and latter biologist and assistant manager of laboratories at McMurdo Station, 1968-69.

Mount DeWitt is a mountain in the Head Mountains, 2,190 metres (7,200 ft) high, rising above the ice plateau just west of Mount Littlepage and the Willett Range, in Victoria Land. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names in 1964 for Hugh H. DeWitt, scientific leader on the Eltanin, 1962–63, who also served on the Glacier, 1958–59.

Jorda Glacier is a glacier, about 15 nautical miles (30 km) long, draining the eastern slopes of the Churchill Mountains between Mount Coley and Pyramid Mountain and merging with the lower Nursery Glacier just before the latter enters the Ross Ice Shelf. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Lieutenant Commander Henry P. Jorda, U.S. Navy, a pilot with Squadron VX-6 during Operation Deep Freeze I, 1955–56.

Ellipsoid Hill is a rounded, partly ice-covered summit, 1,130 metres (3,700 ft) high, to the north of Blue Glacier, between Geoid Glacier and Spheroid Hill, in Victoria Land, Antarctica. The name is one of a group in the area associated with surveying applied in 1993 by the New Zealand Geographic Board, and is for ellipsoid, in geodesy a mathematical figure formed by revolving an ellipse about its minor axis.

Farmer Glacier is a glacier flowing north west into Starshot Glacier, and located between Mount McKerrow to the north and Thompson Mountain to the south, at the southern end of the Surveyors Range in Antarctica. It was named in honor of D. W. Farmer, a member of the 1960 Cape Hallett winter-over team, working as a technician on the geomagnetic project.

Fikkan Peak is a peak midway between Big Brother Bluff and Mount Burnham along the west wall of the Daniels Range, in the Usarp Mountains of Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–63, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Philip R. Fikkan, a United States Antarctic Research Program geologist at McMurdo Station, 1967–68.

Fisher Spur is a rugged rock spur jutting northward from the west flank of the Daniels Range immediately north of Mount Nero, in the Usarp Mountains of Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–63, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Dean F. Fisher, a United States Antarctic Research Program geophysicist at McMurdo Station, 1967–68.

Forsythe Bluff is a bluff rising to more than 2,500 metres (8,200 ft) along the west edge of the Daniels Range, in the Usarp Mountains of Antarctica. The bluff is 11 nautical miles (20 km) north of Big Brother Bluff. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–63, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names after Warren L. Forsythe, a United States Antarctic Research Program geologist at McMurdo Station, 1967–68.

Mount McKerrow is a prominent mountain on the east side of Starshot Glacier, standing 5 nautical miles (9 km) north of Thompson Mountain in the Surveyors Range, Antarctica. It was discovered by the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (1960–61) and named for James McKerrow, a former Surveyor General of New Zealand.

Mount Hoegh is a mountain, 890 metres (2,920 ft) high, standing 1.5 nautical miles (3 km) south-southeast of Duthiers Point on the west coast of Graham Land, Antarctica. It was charted by the Belgian Antarctic Expedition under Gerlache, 1897–99. It was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1960 for Emil von Hoegh (1865–1915), a German mathematical optician who designed the first double anastigmatic camera lens in 1893.

Mansergh Snowfield is a snowfield in Antarctica feeding the central portion of Starshot Glacier, separating the Surveyors Range and Holyoake Range. It was seen by the Holyoake, Cobham and Queen Elizabeth Ranges party of the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (1964–65) and named for G. Mansergh, a geologist with the party.

Mount Hoskins is a mountain, 2,030 metres (6,660 ft) high, standing on the west side of Starshot Glacier, 4 nautical miles (7 km) south of Mount Lindley in Antarctica. It was discovered by the British National Antarctic Expedition, 1901–04, and named for Sir Anthony Hoskins, a former Lord of the Admiralty and a member of the expedition Ship Committee.

Mount Burnham is a projecting, bluff-type mountain, 2,810 metres (9,220 ft) high, along the western wall of the Daniels Range, 6 miles (10 km) south of Big Brother Bluff, in the Usarp Mountains. It was mapped by the U.S. Geological Survey from surveys and from U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–63, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for James B. Burnham, ionospheric physicist who wintered at South Pole Station in 1958 and 1961.