Thompson Nunataks

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Thompson Nunataks ( 79°27′S85°49′W / 79.450°S 85.817°W / -79.450; -85.817 Coordinates: 79°27′S85°49′W / 79.450°S 85.817°W / -79.450; -85.817 ) are three evenly spaced nunataks which lie 4 nautical miles (7 km) south of Navigator Peak and surmount the central part of White Escarpment in the Heritage Range, Ellsworth Mountains. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1961-66. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Russel W. Thompson, United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) meteorologist at Wilkes Station, 1963.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Nunatak Exposed, often rocky element of a ridge, mountain, or peak not covered with ice or snow within an ice field or glacier

A nunatak is an exposed, often rocky element of a ridge, mountain, or peak not covered with ice or snow within an ice field or glacier. They are also called glacial islands. Examples are natural pyramidal peaks. When rounded by glacial action, smaller rock promontories may be referred to as rognons.

Navigator Peak is a sharp and prominent peak, 1,910 m, standing 4 nautical miles (7 km) east of Zavis Peak in the north part of the White Escarpment, Heritage Range. It was named by the University of Minnesota Geological Party to these mountains in 1963–64 because the peak served as a landmark to navigators and pilots returning to camp from flights in the southern part of the Heritage Range.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Thompson Nunataks" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.

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Zohn Nunataks is a set of three nunataks, the largest being Cheeks Nunatak, rising to 1,310 m in the southwest part of Grossman Nunataks, Palmer Land. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy aerial photographs, 1961–68, and Landsat imagery, 1973-74. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) after Harry L. Zohn, Jr., USGS topographic engineer, a member of the USGS-BAS geological party to the Orville Coast, 1977-78.

Inman Nunatak is a nunatak standing 6 miles (10 km) east of Mount Manthe in the southeastern part of the Hudson Mountains, Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–66, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Martin M. Inman, an auroral scientist at Byrd Station in the 1960–61 and 1961–62 seasons.

Aitken Nunatak is a small rock nunatak, 2,785 metres (9,140 ft) high, standing 3 miles (5 km) southwest of Mount Bumstead in the Grosvenor Mountains in Antarctica. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for William M. Aitken, United States Antarctic Research Program aurora scientist at South Pole Station, 1962.

Blackburn Nunatak is a prominent nunatak, 965 metres (3,166 ft) high, marking the north extremity of Rambo Nunataks in the Pensacola Mountains. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and from U.S. Navy air photos, 1956–66, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Lieutenant Archie B. Blackburn, (MC) U.S. Navy, officer in charge at Plateau Station, winter 1967.

Cheeks Nunatak is the largest and southernmost of three nunataks located 12 nautical miles (22 km) northwest of the Merrick Mountains, in Palmer Land. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and from U.S. Navy air photos, 1961–67, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Noble L. Cheeks, aviation electronics technician, member of the R4D party that flew to the vicinity of the eventual Eights Station in 1961 to set up a base camp.

Christoph Nunatak is a nunatak rising to about 1,300 metres (4,300 ft), 2.5 nautical miles (5 km) east-northeast of Holtet Nunatak in the Lyon Nunataks. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from U.S. Navy aerial photographs taken 1965–68 and Landsat imagery taken 1973–74. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names in 1987 after Klaus J. Christoph, upper atmospheric physicist at Siple Station, 1970–71.

Walcott Peak is a large nunatak midway between Mount Jukkola and Lokey Peak in the south part of the Guthridge Nunataks, in central Palmer Land. Mapped by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) in 1974. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Lieutenant Fred P. Walcott, CEC, U.S. Navy, Officer-in-Charge of the South Pole Station in 1973.

DeWitt Nunatak is a nunatak, 1,295 metres (4,250 ft) high, along the face of an ice escarpment 7 nautical miles (13 km) west of Snake Ridge, in the Patuxent Range, Pensacola Mountains. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and from U.S. Navy air photos, 1956–66, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Steven R. DeWitt, a meteorologist at Palmer Station, winter 1966.

Knox Peak is a small but distinctive rock peak, or nunatak, located between Vann Peak and Lackey Ridge at the west end of the Ohio Range, Antarctica. It was surveyed by the United States Antarctic Research Program Horlick Mountains Traverse party in December 1958 and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Antarctic cartographer Arthur S. Knox, who worked for the Branch of Special Maps, U.S. Geological Survey.

Director Nunatak is a conspicuous nunatak standing between the heads of Balch Glacier and Breitfuss Glacier, in Graham Land in Antarctica. It was photographed by Hunting Aerosurveys Ltd in 1955–57, and mapped from these photos by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS). It was so named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1958 because this nunatak was used as a landmark by a FIDS sledge party from Detaille Island in 1957 when traveling on Avery Plateau.

Gowan Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Gowan Glacier is a glacier about 15 nautical miles long in the Heritage Range of the Ellsworth Mountains of Antarctica, flowing north from the vicinity of Cunningham Peak in the Founders Escarpment to enter Minnesota Glacier just east of Welcome Nunatak. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1961–66, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Lieutenant Jimmy L. Gowan, U.S. Navy Medical Corps, officer in charge and doctor at Plateau Station in 1966.

Not to be confused with Pickering Nunatak in Mac. Robertson Land

Island Arena is a broad valley occupied by a lateral lobe of the Darwin Glacier, Antarctica, indenting the north side of the Darwin Mountains between Colosseum Ridge and Kennett Ridge. An islandlike nunatak, Richardson Hill, rises above the ice of the valley. The descriptive name was given by the Victoria University of Wellington Antarctic Expedition (1962–63).

Fendorf Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Fendorf Glacier is a broad glacier draining from the eastern slopes of the Gifford Peaks and flowing north to merge with Dobbratz Glacier, in the Heritage Range of the Ellsworth Mountains, Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from ground surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1961–66, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Lieutenant Commander James E. Fendorf, U.S. Navy, a pilot with Squadron VX-6 during Operation Deep Freeze 1966.

McCrilliss Nunatak is a nunatak marking the north end of the Gierloff Nunataks on the north side of the Wisconsin Range, Horlick Mountains, Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–64, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for construction electrician Harold L. McCrilliss, a member of the winter parties at Byrd Station in 1959 and South Pole Station in 1964.

Higgins Nunatak is the largest of the Samuel Nunataks, lying near the south end of this group in the Heritage Range in Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1961–66, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for utilitiesman John C. Higgins, U.S. Navy, a member of the McMurdo Station party during Operation Deep Freeze 1966.

Tailend Nunatak

Tailend Nunatak is a nunatak, 535 m, at the north end of the Theron Mountains. First mapped in 1956-57 by the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition and so named because it was the last rock feature at the northeast end of the Theron Mountains seen either from the ground or from the air by members of the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition during their survey in 1956-57.

The MacDonald Nunataks are two nunataks overlooking the head of the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica, standing just east of the terminus of Amundsen Glacier, 5 nautical miles (9 km) west of O'Brien Peak. They were mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–64, and were named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for John A. MacDonald, a biologist with the McMurdo Station winter party, 1964.

Staack Nunatak is a nunatak lying 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) west of Horner Nunatak, being one of several scattered and somewhat isolated nunataks located 40 nautical miles (70 km) north of the Merrick Mountains, in Palmer Land. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1961-67. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Karl J. Staack, meteorologist at Byrd Station, summer 1965-66.

Tomandl Nunatak is an isolated nunatak on the south side of Crevasse Valley Glacier, 7 nautical miles (13 km) east of Mount Stancliff, in the Ford Ranges of Marie Byrd Land. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1959-65. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Frank Tomandl, Jr., aviation electrician's mate, U.S. Navy, of the McMurdo Station winter party, 1968.