Thompson Peaks

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Thompson Peaks ( 84°26′S166°30′E / 84.433°S 166.500°E / -84.433; 166.500 Coordinates: 84°26′S166°30′E / 84.433°S 166.500°E / -84.433; 166.500 ) is a two peaks on the divide between upper Moody Glacier and Bingley Glacier in the Queen Alexandra Range. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Douglas C. Thompson, United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) cosmic rays scientist at McMurdo Station, 1963; South Pole Station, 1965.

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Moody Glacier is a glacier between Martin Ridge and the Adams Mountains in the Queen Alexandra Range of Antarctica, draining south into Berwick Glacier. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for P.R. Moody, U.S. Navy, a Construction Electrician at McMurdo Station, winter 1963.

Bingley Glacier is a glacier 8 nautical miles (15 km) long in the Queen Alexandra Range, draining south from the slopes of Mount Kirkpatrick, Mount Dickerson and Barnes Peak and entering Beardmore Glacier just north of the Adams Mountains. It was named by Ernest Shackleton of the British Antarctic Expedition, 1907–09, after Bingley, England, the ancestral home of the Shackleton family.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Thompson Peaks" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

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The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


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