Thompson Peninsula

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Thompson Peninsula ( 64°28′S63°8′W / 64.467°S 63.133°W / -64.467; -63.133 Coordinates: 64°28′S63°8′W / 64.467°S 63.133°W / -64.467; -63.133 ) is a peninsula 3 nautical miles (6 km) long forming the north side of the entrance to Fournier Bay, on Anvers Island in the Palmer Archipelago. Surveyed by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) in 1955-57, and named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) for John W. Thompson (1928-2012) of FIDS, general assistant and mountaineer at Arthur Harbor in 1956 and leader at that station in 1957.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Peninsula A piece of land that is bordered by water on three sides but connected to mainland

A peninsula is a landform surrounded by water on the majority of its border while being connected to a mainland from which it extends. The surrounding water is usually understood to be continuous, though not necessarily named as a single body of water. Peninsulas are not always named as such; one can also be a headland, cape, island promontory, bill, point, or spit. A point is generally considered a tapering piece of land projecting into a body of water that is less prominent than a cape. A river which courses through a very tight meander is also sometimes said to form a "peninsula" within the loop of water. In English, the plural versions of peninsula are peninsulas and, less commonly, peninsulae.

Fournier Bay bay

Fournier Bay is a bay 8 nautical miles (15 km) long and 3 nautical miles (6 km) wide, indenting the northeast coast of Anvers Island immediately west of Briggs Peninsula and south of Dralfa Point, in the Palmer Archipelago, Antarctica. Its head is fed by Rhesus, Thamyris, Kleptuza and Altimir Glaciers.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Thompson Peninsula" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


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Last Hill is a small hill, 350 metres (1,150 ft) high, with a rock ridge at its crest and a cliff at its north side, standing 4 nautical miles (7 km) south-southwest of Hope Bay and 2 nautical miles (4 km) east of the northeast shore of Duse Bay on Tabarin Peninsula, Antarctica. It was probably seen by the Swedish Antarctic Expedition, 1901–04, under Otto Nordenskjöld, but was first charted in 1946 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey, who so named it because it marks the last climb on the sledge route between Hope Bay and Duse Bay.

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