Thompson Sound (New Zealand)

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Te Awa-o-Tū / Thompson Sound
NZ Fiordland relief location map.svg
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Te Awa-o-Tū / Thompson Sound
Location in New Zealand
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Disc Plain red.svg
Te Awa-o-Tū / Thompson Sound
Te Awa-o-Tū / Thompson Sound (New Zealand)
Location Fiordland
Coordinates 45°15′0″S167°00′00″E / 45.25000°S 167.00000°E / -45.25000; 167.00000 Coordinates: 45°15′0″S167°00′00″E / 45.25000°S 167.00000°E / -45.25000; 167.00000
Native nameTe Awa-o-Tū  (Māori)
Part of Tasman Sea
River sources Pandora River, Namu River
Basin  countries New Zealand
Max. length21 km (13 mi)
Max. width1 km (0.62 mi)

Thompson Sound (Māori : Te Awa-o-Tū; officially Te Awa-o-Tū / Thompson Sound) is a fiord of the South Island of New Zealand. It is one of the fiords that form the coast of Fiordland.

Contents

Geography

Thompson Sound (New Zealand)
Te Awa-o-Tū / Thompson Sound

The fiord is connected at its farthest extent with Pendulo Reach, [1] part of Doubtful Sound / Patea, and between them Thompson and Doubtful Sounds form the non-Tasman Sea coast of Secretary Island. It is 21 kilometres in length. Kaikiekie / Bradshaw Sound, which extends east from the junction of Doubtful and Thompson Sounds, is geographically and geologically an extension of Thompson Sound. Several small rivers flow into Thompson Sound, among them the Pandora and Namu Rivers. [1]

History

Thompson Sound was given its European name by John Grono, a sealer who worked the Fiordland coast in the early 19th century, after his boat's owner, Andrew Thompson. [2] [3] Grono himself is honoured in the name of the 1196-metre Mount Grono, the highest point on Secretary Island. Later surveyor Captain John Stokes incorrectly thought that the sound had been named after Colonial Secretary Edward Deas Thomson, and named an indentation in the sound's Secretary Island coast as Deas Cove. [2] In October 2019, the name of the fiord was officially altered to Te Awa-o-Tū / Thompson Sound. [4]

Related Research Articles

Milford Sound / Piopiotahi Fiord in the south west of New Zealands South Island

Milford Sound / Piopiotahi is a fiord in the south west of New Zealand's South Island within Fiordland National Park, Piopiotahi Marine Reserve, and the Te Wahipounamu World Heritage site. It has been judged the world's top travel destination in an international survey and is acclaimed as New Zealand's most famous tourist destination. Rudyard Kipling had previously called it the eighth Wonder of the World. The fiord is most commonly accessed via road by tour coach, with the road terminating at a small village also called Milford Sound.

Fiordland Geographical region of New Zealand

Fiordland is a geographical region of New Zealand in the south-western corner of the South Island, comprising the westernmost third of Southland. Most of Fiordland is dominated by the steep sides of the snow-capped Southern Alps, deep lakes, and its steep, glacier-carved and now ocean-flooded western valleys. The name "Fiordland" comes from a variant spelling of the Scandinavian word for this type of steep valley, "fjord". The area of Fiordland is dominated by, and very roughly coterminous with, Fiordland National Park, New Zealand's largest National Park.

Fiordland National Park National park on South Island of New Zealand

Fiordland National Park occupies the southwest corner of the South Island of New Zealand. It is by far the largest of the 13 national parks in New Zealand, with an area of 12,607 square kilometres (4,868 sq mi), and a major part of the Te Wahipounamu World Heritage Site. The park is administered by the Department of Conservation.

Doubtful Sound / Patea Fiord in New Zealand

Doubtful Sound / Patea is a fiord in Fiordland, in the far south west of New Zealand. It is located in the same region as the smaller but more famous and accessible Milford Sound / Piopiotahi. It took second place after Milford Sound as New Zealand's most famous tourism destination.

Secretary Island Island in southwestern New Zealand

Secretary Island is an island in southwestern New Zealand, lying entirely within Fiordland National Park. Roughly triangular in shape, it lies between Doubtful Sound / Patea in the south and Te Awa-o-Tū / Thompson Sound in the north, with its west coast facing the Tasman Sea. To the east of the island, Pendulo Reach connects Te Awa-o-Tū / Thompson Sound with Doubtful Sound / Patea. Steeply sloped, the entirely bush-clad island rises to a chain of several peaks higher than 1000 metres. The highest of these is the 1,196-metre (3,924 ft) Mount Grono, the highest peak in the main New Zealand chain not located in the North or South Island. The island also contains three lakes. The largest, Secretary Lake, over 600 metres (2,000 ft) long, is located beneath Mount Grono at an altitude of 550 metres (1,800 ft).

Rakituma / Preservation Inlet Body of water

Rakituma / Preservation Inlet is the southernmost fiord in Fiordland National Park and lies on the southwest corner of the South Island of New Zealand. With an area of 93 square kilometres (36 sq mi), it is the fourth largest fiord in New Zealand, after Tamatea / Dusky Sound, Doubtful Sound / Patea, and the neighbouring Taiari / Chalky Inlet to the north. Rakituma was briefly the site of an attempted fishing and gold mining settlement at Cromarty during the 19th century, however this was quickly abandoned once the level of gold declined in relation to more promising fields elsewhere.

Hāwea / Bligh Sound is a fiord of the South Island of New Zealand. It is located in Fiordland, 30 kilometres southwest of Milford Sound, and is 15 kilometres in length. The fiord forms a crooked "Z" shape. Wild Natives River flows into the innermost arm, Bounty Haven.

Bradshaw Sound Body of water

Kaikiekie / Bradshaw Sound is one of the larger New Zealand fiords. It is one of the sub fiords/arms that make up the Doubtful Sound/Thompson Sound complex and forms the northernmost of the blind or dead end fiords in this system.

Te Rā / Dagg Sound is a narrow fiord located in Fiordland, New Zealand. It lies south of Doubtful Sound / Patea and north of Te Puaitaha / Breaksea Sound. Whales frequent the waters out from the entrance of the fiord, close to the edge of the continental shelf where the water depth suddenly drops to thousands of metres.

Sutherland Sound is a fiord of the South Island of New Zealand. It is the smallest of the fiords that make up the coast of Fiordland, and the only one with limited sea access. It is the second most northerly of the fiords, 22 kilometres southwest of Milford Sound / Piopiotahi and eight kilometres northeast of Hāwea / Bligh Sound. The fiord is ten kilometres in length and the Light River and the Dark River flow into the eastern end. The fiord is composed of two main sections - a large bay opening into the sea, and a more traditional fiord as the inner section. These are separated by a narrow channel less than 100 metres (330 ft) wide at its narrowest point.

Taiporoporo / Charles Sound is a fiord of the South Island of New Zealand. It is one of the fiords that form the coast of Fiordland.

Taitetimu / Caswell Sound is a fiord of the South Island of New Zealand. It is one of the fiords that form the coast of Fiordland.

Te Houhou / George Sound is a fiord of the South Island of New Zealand. It is one of the fiords that form the coast of Fiordland.

Hinenui / Nancy Sound is a fiord on the South Island of New Zealand. It is one of the fiords that form the coast of Fiordland.

Taiari / Chalky Inlet Inlet in New Zealand

Taiari / Chalky Inlet is one of the southernmost fiords in Fiordland, in the southwestern corner of New Zealand's South Island and part of Fiordland National Park. As with the neighbouring fiords of Tamatea / Dusky Sound to the north and Rakituma / Preservation Inlet to the south, Taiari / Chalky Inlet is a complex fiord with many channels and islands along its roughly 28 kilometres (17 mi) length. Most notably, this includes the sections Moana-whenua-pōuri / Edwardson Sound and Te Korowhakaunu / Kanáris Sound, which split at Divide Head in the middle of Taiari and each extend for roughly 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) inland in a V-shape.

Taipari Roa (Elizabeth Island) Marine Reserve

Taipari Roa Marine Reserve is a marine reserve covering an area of 613 hectares around Elizabeth Island, in the inner Doubtful Sound / Patea of Fiordland on New Zealand's South Island. It was established in 2005 and is administered by the Department of Conservation.

Te Hapua Marine Reserve is a marine reserve covering an area of 449 hectares of Te Hāpua / Sutherland Sound, in Fiordland on New Zealand's South Island. It was established in 2005 and is administered by the Department of Conservation.

Te Awaatu Channel (The Gut) Marine Reserve

Te Awaatu Channel Marine Reserve is a marine reserve covering an area of 93 hectares in Fiordland on New Zealand's South Island. It was established in 1993 and is administered by the Department of Conservation.

References

  1. 1 2 NZ Topographic Map: Thompson Sound
  2. 1 2 Foster, A. "Sounds Complicated", New Zealand Geographic, 37, January–March 1998. Retrieved 30 September 2017.
  3. The fiords of Fiordland", Southern Discoveries, 15 August 2016. Retrieved 30 September 2017.
  4. "NZGB notices – October 2019". Land Information New Zealand. 17 October 2019. Retrieved 15 December 2019.