Thompson Spur

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Thompson Spur ( 71°33′S160°23′E / 71.550°S 160.383°E / -71.550; 160.383 Coordinates: 71°33′S160°23′E / 71.550°S 160.383°E / -71.550; 160.383 ) is a large, rugged mountain spur that descends eastward from Daniels Range between the Swanson Glacier and Edwards Glacier, in the Usarp Mountains. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960-63. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for David H. Thompson, United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) biologist at Hallett Station, 1965–66 and 1967-68.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Mountain A large landform that rises fairly steeply above the surrounding land over a limited area

A mountain is a large landform that rises above the surrounding land in a limited area, usually in the form of a peak. A mountain is generally steeper than a hill. Mountains are formed through tectonic forces or volcanism. These forces can locally raise the surface of the earth. Mountains erode slowly through the action of rivers, weather conditions, and glaciers. A few mountains are isolated summits, but most occur in huge mountain ranges.

Daniels Range

The Daniels Range is a principal mountain range of the Usarp Mountains, about 80 km (50 mi) long and 16 km (10 mi) wide, bounded to the north by Harlin Glacier and to the south by Gressitt Glacier. The range was mapped by USGS from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960-63. Named by US-ACAN after Ambassador Paul C. Daniels (1903–86), a leading American figure in the formulation of the Antarctic Treaty in 1959.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Thompson Spur" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.

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Queen Elizabeth Range (Antarctica) mountain range in Antarctica

The Queen Elizabeth Range is a rugged mountain range of the Transantarctic Mountains System, located in the Ross Dependency region of Antarctica.

Usarp Mountains

The Usarp Mountains is a major Antarctic mountain range, lying westward of the Rennick Glacier and trending N-S for about 190 kilometres (118 mi). The feature is bounded to the north by Pryor Glacier and the Wilson Hills. Its important constituent parts include Welcome Mountain, Mount Van der Hoeven, Mount Weihaupt, Mount Stuart, Mount Lorius, Smith Bench, Mount Roberts, Pomerantz Tableland, Daniels Range, Emlen Peaks, Helliwell Hills and Morozumi Range.

Trojan Range

The Trojan Range is a mountain range rising to 2,760 metres (9,055 ft), extending northward from Mount Francais along the east side of Iliad Glacier, Anvers Island, in the Palmer Archipelago of the British Antarctic Territory. It was surveyed by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) in 1955 and named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) for the Trojans, one of the opposing sides in the Trojan War in Homer's Iliad.

Allegro Valley is a steep-sided, glacier-filled valley indenting the east side of Daniels Range just north of White Spur, in the Usarp Mountains, Antarctica. The northern party of the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition, 1963–64, experienced fine weather here after several days of unpleasant travel; therefore, the expedition members named it after John Milton's poem L'Allegro in antithesis to Penseroso Bluff, 14 miles (23 km) to the north. The valley is situated on the Pennell Coast, a portion of Antarctica lying between Cape Williams and Cape Adare.

Asimut Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Asimutbreen Glacier is a small, steep tributary glacier to Vangengeym Glacier, descending southeast and then northeast between Solhogdene Heights and Skuggekammen Ridge, in the eastern Gruber Mountains of the Wohlthat Mountains, Queen Maud Land. It was discovered and plotted from air photos by the Third German Antarctic Expedition, 1938–39, replotted from air photos and from surveys by the Sixth Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1956–60, and named Asimutbreen.

Walsh Glacier is a tributary glacier in the central part of Wilson Hills. It drains east-northeast along the south side of Goodman Hills to enter the lower part of Tomilin Glacier. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960-64. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Gary Walsh, United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) biologist at Hallett Station, 1968-69.

Crume Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Crume Glacier is a tributary glacier, 5 nautical miles (9 km) long, flowing east to enter Ommanney Glacier near the north coast of Victoria Land, Antarctica. The geographical feature was first mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and from U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–63, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for William R. Crume, AS1, U.S. Navy, Support Equipment Maintenance Supervisor with Squadron VX-6 at McMurdo Station, Hut Point Peninsula, Ross Island, during Operation Deep Freeze 1968. The glacier lies situated on the Pennell Coast, a portion of Antarctica lying between Cape Williams and Cape Adare.

Svendsen Glacier is a meandering glacier, 13 nautical miles (24 km) long, in the Usarp Mountains. It flows northeastward from Mount Marzolf and emerges between McCain Bluff and Lenfant Bluff onto an ice piedmont just west of the terminus of Rennick Glacier. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960-62. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Kendall L. Svendsen, United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) geomagnetist at McMurdo Station, 1967-68.

Swanson Glacier is a glacier, 9 nautical miles (17 km) long, draining the east slopes of Daniels Range northward of Thompson Spur, in the Usarp Mountains. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960-63. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Charles D. Swanson, United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) biologist at McMurdo Station, 1967-68.

Steuri Glacier is a glacier descending the southern slopes of Mount Takahe in Marie Byrd Land. The feature is 3.5 nautical miles (6 km) west of Moll Spur. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy aerial photography, 1959-66. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Heinrich Steuri, United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) glaciologist at Byrd Station, 1968-69.

Fruitcake Bluff is a steep rock outcrop in the form of a bluff 100 metres (330 ft) high, extending in a northeast–southwest direction for 1 nautical mile (2 km) in the southeast portion of Thompson Spur, in the Daniels Range, Victoria Land, Antarctica. It was recorded by United States Antarctic Research Program geologists C.C. Plummer and R.S. Babcock, who made a geological reconnaissance of Daniels Range in December 1981. It was descriptively named from the prevalent intrusive rock on the bluff which has the appearance in color and texture of a fruitcake. The bluff lies situated on the Pennell Coast, a portion of Antarctica lying between Cape Williams and Cape Adare.

Edwards Glacier is a glacier draining the east slopes of the Daniels Range between Thompson Spur and Schroeder Spur, in the Usarp Mountains of Victoria Land, Antarctica. This glacier was first mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–63, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Lloyd N. Edwards, a United States Antarctic Research Program geologist at McMurdo Station, Hut Point Peninsula, Ross Island, 1967–68. The glacier lies situated on the Pennell Coast, a portion of Antarctica lying between Cape Williams and Cape Adare.

Glitrefonna Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Glitrefonna Glacier is a glacier at the north side of Mount Bergersen in the Sør Rondane Mountains of Antarctica. It was mapped by Norwegian cartographers in 1957 from air photos taken by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump, 1946–47, and named Glitrefonna.

Lovejoy Glacier is a broad glacier descending eastward through the Usarp Mountains of Antarctica between Anderson Pyramid and the Sample Nunataks. In its lower course, the glacier runs side by side with the larger Harlin Glacier to the south without a ridge separating the two. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–62, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Lieutenant Owen B. Lovejoy of U.S. Navy Squadron VX-6, a pilot of R4D aircraft in Antarctica, 1962–63 and 1963–64.

Mendeleyev Glacier glacier in Antarctica

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Mount Harrison is a large mountain, 1,955 metres (6,410 ft) high, which dominates the ridge separating Robilliard Glacier and Svendsen Glacier, in the Usarp Mountains of Antarctica. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Louis J. Harrison, a US Army helicopter mechanic in the field in support of the United States Geological Survey surveys Topo North–South (1961–62) and Topo East–West (1962–63), the latter including the survey of this mountain.

Mount Schaefer is a mountain (1,825 m) which marks the west extremity of Robinson Heights in the Admiralty Mountains. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy photography, 1960–63. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Paul W. Schaefer, United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) biologist at McMurdo Station, 1966–67.

Schroeder Spur is a large mountain spur lying south of Edwards Glacier and the parallel Thompson Spur, at the south end of Daniels Range, Usarp Mountains. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960-63. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Lauren A. Schroeder, United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) biologist at McMurdo Station, 1967-68.

Mount Toogood is a mountain (2,100 m) at the south side of the head of Edwards Glacier in the Daniels Range, Usarp Mountains. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–63. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for David J. Toogood, United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) geologist at McMurdo Station, 1967–68 and 1968–69.

Mount Tokoroa is a massive snow-covered mountain in Antarctica. It is on a spur of the Explorers Range, Bowers Mountains, standing 6 nautical miles (11 km) southeast of the summit of Mount Soza at the junction of the Morley and Carryer Glaciers. Mapped by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Topo West party, 1962–63, and named by members of this party for Tokoroa, New Zealand, in recognition of its kindness to United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) personnel.