Thomsen

Last updated
Thomsen
Origin
Meaningson of Thomas
Region of origin Denmark
Other names
Variant form(s)Thomason, Thomson, Thompson

Thomsen is a Danish patronymic surname meaning "son of Tom (or Thomas)", itself derived from the Aramaic תום or Tôm, meaning "twin". There are many varied surname spellings, with the first historical record believed to be found in 1252. Thomsen is uncommon as a given name. [1] [2] [3]

Contents

People with the surname Thomsen include:

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References

  1. Hanks, Hardcastle and Hodges, Oxford Dictionary of First Names, Oxford University Press, 2nd edition, ISBN   978-0-19-861060-1, p. 260.
  2. "Thomsen Surname Meaning and Distribution". ancestry.co.uk. Retrieved 25 January 2014
  3. "Surname: Thomsen". surnamedb.com. Name Origin Research. Retrieved 2014-05-07.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)

See also