Thomsen Islands

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Thomsen Islands ( 65°47′S66°16′W / 65.783°S 66.267°W / -65.783; -66.267 Coordinates: 65°47′S66°16′W / 65.783°S 66.267°W / -65.783; -66.267 ) is a group of small islands lying 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) southwest of Speerschneider Point, off the west side of Renaud Island in the Biscoe Islands. First accurately shown on an Argentine government chart of 1957. Named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1959 for Helge Thomsen, Danish meteorologist, who, for a number of years beginning in 1946, was responsible for editing Dansk Meteorologisk Institut's annual reports on the state of the sea ice in the Arctic.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Speerschneider Point is a point forming the west side of the entrance to Malmgren Bay on the west side of Renaud Island, in the Biscoe Islands. First accurately shown on an Argentine government chart of 1957. Named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1959 for C.I.H. Speerschneider, Danish meteorologist, who was editor of the annual reports on the state of the sea ice in the Arctic issued by Dansk Meteorologisk Institut, 1910-34.

Renaud Island

Renaud Island is an ice-covered island, 40 km (25 mi) long and from 6.4 to 16.1 km wide, lying between the Pitt Islands and Rabot Island in the Biscoe Islands of Antarctica. It is separated from Pitt Islands to the northeast by Mraka Sound, and from Lavoisier Island to the southwest by Pendleton Strait. Zubov Bay is a 2.5 mile bay that indents the east side of the island.

See also

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Thomsen Islands" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


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