Thomsen Round Barn

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Thomsen Round Barn
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Location Off Iowa Highway 15
Nearest city Armstrong, Iowa
Coordinates 43°20′46″N94°29′52″W / 43.34611°N 94.49778°W / 43.34611; -94.49778 Coordinates: 43°20′46″N94°29′52″W / 43.34611°N 94.49778°W / 43.34611; -94.49778
Area less than one acre
Built 1912
MPS Iowa Round Barns: The Sixty Year Experiment TR
NRHP reference # 86001426 [1]
Added to NRHP June 30, 1986

The Thomsen Round Barn was an historical building located near Armstrong in rural Emmet County, Iowa, United States. It was built in 1912 as a dairy barn. [2] The building is a true round barn that measures 65 feet (20 m) in diameter. [3] The first floor is constructed of concrete and the second floor consists of white vertical siding. It features a two-pitch conical roof, and a 16-foot (4.9 m) central silo. [3] The barn was listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1986. [1] As of July 21, 2014 it is no longer standing. [3]

Armstrong, Iowa City in Iowa, United States

Armstrong is a city in Emmet County, Iowa, United States. The population was 926 at the 2010 census. It was originally known as Armstrong Grove.

Emmet County, Iowa County in the United States

Emmet County is a county located in the U.S. state of Iowa. As of the 2010 census, the population was 10,302. The county seat is Estherville.

Round barn circular storage building

A round barn is a historic barn design that could be octagonal, polygonal, or circular in plan. Though round barns were not as popular as some other barn designs, their unique shape makes them noticeable. The years from 1880–1920 represent the height of round barn construction. Round barn construction in the United States can be divided into two overlapping eras. The first, the octagonal era, spanned from 1850–1900. The second, the true circular era, spanned from 1889–1936. The overlap meant that round barns of both types, polygonal and circular, were built during the latter part of the nineteenth century. Numerous round barns in the United States are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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John W. Young Round Barn

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Wickfield Round Barn

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. "Thomsen Round Barn". National Park Service . Retrieved 2017-12-06. with a photo
  3. 1 2 3 Dale Travis. "Iowa Round Barn List". Round Barns & Covered Bridges. Retrieved 2011-01-07.