Thomson–Urrutia Treaty

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The Thomson–Urrutia Treaty was signed on April 20, 1921 between the United States and Colombia. Based on the terms of the agreement, the U.S. paid Colombia 25 million dollars in return for Colombia's recognition of Panama's independence. This resolved the United States support of the separation of Panama from Colombia in 1903. [1] It was successfully negotiated and signed by the US on April 6, 1914 and ratified by Colombia on June 9 of that year [2] but not ratified by the US until 1921.

United States federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the largest city by population is New York City. Forty-eight states and the capital's federal district are contiguous in North America between Canada and Mexico. The State of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, bordered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. The State of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The U.S. territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, stretching across nine official time zones. The extremely diverse geography, climate, and wildlife of the United States make it one of the world's 17 megadiverse countries.

Colombia Country in South America

Colombia, officially the Republic of Colombia, is a sovereign state largely situated in the northwest of South America, with territories in Central America. Colombia shares a border to the northwest with Panama, to the east with Venezuela and Brazil and to the south with Ecuador and Peru. It shares its maritime limits with Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Honduras, Jamaica, Haiti, and the Dominican Republic. Colombia is a unitary, constitutional republic comprising thirty-two departments, with the capital in Bogota.

Panama republic in Central America

Panama, officially the Republic of Panama, is a country in Central America, bordered by Costa Rica to the west, Colombia to the southeast, the Caribbean Sea to the north, and the Pacific Ocean to the south. The capital and largest city is Panama City, whose metropolitan area is home to nearly half the country's 4 million people.

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Francisco José Urrutia Olano Diplomat, jurist

Francisco José Urrutia Olano was a Colombian diplomat and international jurist. He served as Colombia's Minister of Foreign Affairs first from 1908 to 1909, and again from 1912 to 1914, which during he signed the Thomson–Urrutia Treaty, which re-established diplomatic relations between the United States and Colombia. He was Minister Plenipotentiary to the governments of Bolivia, Spain, Switzerland, and Permanent Representative to the League of Nations Assembly, holding the Presidency of the Executive Council in representation of Colombia in 1928. In 1931 he was elected to serve as Permanent Judge on the Permanent Court of International Justice at The Hague, where he served until 1942 when he resigned due to theonset of World War II.

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Panama–United States relations

Panama–United States relations are bilateral relations between Panama and the United States.

The U.S.—German Peace Treaty is a peace treaty between the U.S. and German governments, signed in Berlin on August 25, 1921, in the aftermath of World War I. The main reason for the conclusion of that treaty was the fact that the U.S. Senate did not consent to ratification of the multilateral peace treaty signed in Versailles, thus leading to a separate peace treaty. Ratifications were exchanged in Berlin on November 11, 1921, and the treaty became effective on the same day. The treaty was registered in League of Nations Treaty Series on August 12, 1922.

The U.S.–Hungarian Peace Treaty is a peace treaty between the United States and the Kingdom of Hungary, signed in Budapest on August 29, 1921, in the aftermath of the First World War. This separate peace treaty was required because the United States Senate refused to ratify the multilateral Treaty of Trianon.

The Anderson–Gual Treaty was an 1824 treaty between the United States and Gran Colombia. It is the first bilateral treaty that the United States concluded with another American country.

Mexico–Panama relations

Mexico-Panama relations refers to the diplomatic relations between Mexico and Panama. Both nations are mutual members of the Association of Caribbean States, Community of Latin American and Caribbean States, Latin American Integration Association, Organization of Ibero-American States and the Organization of American States.

References

  1. Lael, Richard L. (1978). "Struggle for Ratification: Wilson, Lodge, and the Thomson-Urrutia Treaty". Diplomatic History. 2: 81–102. doi:10.1111/j.1467-7709.1978.tb00423.x . Retrieved August 15, 2012.
  2. Francisco Escobar (Jul 13, 1914). "Why the Colombian Treaty Should be Ratified". The Independent. Retrieved August 14, 2012.