Thomson Burtis

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Thomson Burtis (1896–1971) [1] was an American writer.

Burtis worked as a newspaper reporter before becoming a writer. [2] He wrote more than two hundred stories for pulp magazines such as Adventure . [2] [3] In Old Oklahoma was one of several films that were adapted from his short stories. [4]

<i>Adventure</i> (magazine) American pulp magazine 1910 to 1971; 881 issues (usu. monthly)

Adventure was an American pulp magazine that was first published in November 1910 by the Ridgway company, an offshoot of the Butterick Publishing Company. Adventure went on to become one of the most profitable and critically acclaimed of all the American pulp magazines. The magazine had 881 issues. The magazine's first editor was Trumbull White, he was succeeded in 1912 by Arthur Sullivant Hoffman (1876–1966), who would edit the magazine until 1927.

<i>In Old Oklahoma</i> 1943 film by Albert S. Rogell

In Old Oklahoma is a 1943 American Western film directed by Albert S. Rogell starring John Wayne and Martha Scott. The film was nominated for two Academy Awards, one for Music Score of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture and the other for Sound Recording.

In the 1920s, Burtis also began to write aviation fiction for children. Many of these stories appeared in The American Boy . [5]

<i>The American Boy</i> (magazine)

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References

  1. "Authors : Burtis, Thomson : SFE : Science Fiction Encyclopedia". www.sf-encyclopedia.com. Retrieved 9 November 2017.
  2. 1 2 Jones, Robert Kenneth. The Lure of Adventure. Starmont House,1989 ISBN   1-55742-143-9 (p.23)
  3. http://www.philsp.com/homeville/fmi/d610.htm#A18755
  4. "Thomson Burtis". IMDb. Retrieved 9 November 2017.
  5. Erisman, Fred, Boys' Books, Boys' Dreams, and the Mystique of Flight. Boys' Books, Boys' Dreams, and the Mystique of Flight. TCU Press, 2006. ISBN   0-87565-330-8 (pp. 88-92)