Thomson Cove

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Thomson Cove ( 65°6′S63°14′W / 65.100°S 63.233°W / -65.100; -63.233 Coordinates: 65°6′S63°14′W / 65.100°S 63.233°W / -65.100; -63.233 ) is a cove 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) wide, lying just north of Etienne Fjord in Flandres Bay, along the west coast of Graham Land. First charted and named "Baie Thomson" by the French Antarctic Expedition under Charcot, 1903–05, for Gaston-Arnold-Marie Thomson (1848–1932), French politician who was Minister of the Navy in 1905.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Cove A small sheltered bay or coastal inlet

A cove is a small type of bay or coastal inlet. Coves usually have narrow, restricted entrances, are often circular or oval, and are often situated within a larger bay. Small, narrow, sheltered bays, inlets, creeks, or recesses in a coast are often considered coves.

Flandres Bay is a large bay lying between Cape Renard and Cape Willems, along the west coast of Graham Land, Antarctica. It was explored in 1898 by the Belgian Antarctic Expedition under Gerlache, who named it, probably after the historical area of Flandres.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Thomson Cove" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


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Rahir Point headland

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