Thomson Glacier

Last updated
Thomson Glacier
Antarctica relief location map.jpg
Blue pog.svg
Location of Thomson Glacier in Antarctica
Location Bryan Coast
Coordinates 73°27′S80°13′W / 73.450°S 80.217°W / -73.450; -80.217
Length8 nmi (15 km; 9 mi)
Thicknessunknown
Statusunknown

Thomson Glacier ( 73°27′S80°13′W / 73.450°S 80.217°W / -73.450; -80.217 Coordinates: 73°27′S80°13′W / 73.450°S 80.217°W / -73.450; -80.217 ) is a glacier about 8 nautical miles (15 km) long on Bryan Coast flowing between Rydberg and Wirth Peninsulas into Fladerer Bay. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) after Janet W. Thomson, British Antarctic Survey, head of the mapping operations from the 1980s to 2002, and member of the USA-UK cooperative project to compile Glaciological and Coastal-Change Maps of the Antarctic Peninsula.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Glacier Persistent body of ice that is moving under its own weight

A glacier is a persistent body of dense ice that is constantly moving under its own weight; it forms where the accumulation of snow exceeds its ablation over many years, often centuries. Glaciers slowly deform and flow due to stresses induced by their weight, creating crevasses, seracs, and other distinguishing features. They also abrade rock and debris from their substrate to create landforms such as cirques and moraines. Glaciers form only on land and are distinct from the much thinner sea ice and lake ice that form on the surface of bodies of water.

Bryan Coast is that portion of the coast of Antarctica along the south shore of the Bellingshausen Sea between Pfrogner Point and the northern tip of the Rydberg Peninsula. To the west is Eights Coast, and to the east is English Coast. The eastern end of this coast was discovered from the air during flights of the United States Antarctic Service (1939–41) and the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition (1947–48). The entire coast was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and from U.S. Navy air photos, 1961–67. Originally named George Bryan Coast after R. Admiral George S. Bryan, Hydrographer of the U.S. Navy, 1938–46, under whose direction noteworthy contributions to polar geography were made, the name has been shortened for the sake of brevity.

See also

Related Research Articles

Williams Ice Stream is an ice stream about fifteen miles long flowing into Venable Ice Shelf just east of Fletcher Peninsula. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) after Richard S. Williams, Jr., senior research geologist, United States Geological Survey (USGS), Woods Hole, Massachusetts, authority in aerial and satellite investigations of geomorphic processes and the fluctuations of glaciers on a global basis, particularly in Iceland and Antarctica; project leader of the team that is compiling 25 Glaciological and Coastal-Change Maps of Antarctica, and that compiled the 1:5,000,000-scale Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer maps of Antarctica.

Airy Glacier glacier in Antarctica

The Airy Glacier is a glacier 20 nautical miles (37 km) long and 6 nautical miles (11 km) wide, flowing west to the northeast portion of Forster Ice Piedmont, near the west coast of the Antarctic Peninsula.

Argonaut Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Argonaut Glacier is a tributary glacier about 10 miles (16 km) long in the Mountaineer Range of Victoria Land, Antarctica. It flows east to enter Mariner Glacier just north of Engberg Bluff. It was named by the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition, 1962–63, in association with Aeronaut, Cosmonaut and Cosmonette Glaciers.

Iliad Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Iliad Glacier is a glacier flowing northeast from the central highlands of Anvers Island between the Achaean Range and the Trojan Range into Lapeyrere Bay, in the Palmer Archipelago, Antarctica. It was surveyed in 1955 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey and named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee for Homer's Iliad.

Albone Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Albone Glacier is a deeply entrenched narrow glacier on the east side of Wolseley Buttress flowing southward from Detroit Plateau on Nordenskjöld Coast in Graham Land, Antarctica.

Haskell Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Haskell Glacier is a small glacier descending from the Christoffersen Heights and draining west between Prism Ridge and the Forbidden Rocks, in the Jones Mountains of Antarctica. It was mapped by the University of Minnesota Jones Mountains Party, 1960–61, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Lieutenant Hugh B. Haskell, U.S. Navy, co-pilot on a pioneer flight of November 25, 1961 from Byrd Station to establish Sky-High Camp at 75°14′S77°6′W.

Wirth Peninsula is a broad ice-covered peninsula, 37 kilometres (20 nmi) long, between Eltanin Bay and Fladerer Bay in Ellsworth Land, Antarctica. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1961-66. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Captain Laurence Wirth, commander of USNS Eltanin on Antarctic cruises, September 1966-November 1967.

Bader Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Bader Glacier is a small glacier draining the west slopes of Rudozem Heights and flowing to Bourgeois Fjord just south of Thomson Head on German Peninsula, Fallières Coast on the west side of Graham Land, Antarctica.

Baranowski Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Baranowski Glacier is a glacier flowing east into Admiralty Bay, King George Island, northwest of Demay Point. It was named by the Polish Antarctic Expedition after Stanisław Baranowski (1935–78), Polish glaciologist who died on King George Island as a result of an accident at the Henryk Arctowski Polish Antarctic Station while a member of the 1977–78 expedition.

Beakley Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Beakley Glacier is a glacier on the west side of the Duncan Peninsula on Carney Island, flowing north into the Amundsen Sea. It was delineated by the United States Geological Survey from aerial photos taken by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump in January 1947, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Vice Admiral W.M. Beakley, U.S. Navy, Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Ship Operations and Readiness during the IGY period, 1957–58.

Chavez Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Chavez Glacier is a glacier about 10 nmi long flowing south from Canisteo Peninsula into Cranton Bay. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names after Pat Chavez of the United States Geological Survey (USGS), Flagstaff, Arizona, co-leader of the USGS team that compiled the 1:5,000,000-scale Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer maps of Antarctica in the 1990s.

Deadmond Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Deadmond Glacier is a glacier about 6 nautical miles (11 km) long, flowing from the east side of Evans Peninsula on Thurston Island into Cadwalader Inlet. It was discovered by the U.S. Navy Bellingshausen Sea Expedition in February 1960, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Lieutenant Commander Robert B. Deadmond, executive officer of USS Burton Island, forming part of this expedition.

Tverregg Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Tverregg Glacier is a glacier between Heksegryta Peaks and Tverregga Spur in the Kirwan Escarpment, Queen Maud Land. Mapped by Norwegian cartographers from surveys and air photos by Norwegian-British-Swedish Antarctic Expedition (NBSAE) (1949–52) and additional air photos (1958–59), and named Tverreggbreen.

Fourcade Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Fourcade Glacier is a glacier at the head of Potter Cove, Maxwell Bay, on King George Island in the South Shetland Islands. It was named by the Polish Antarctic Expedition, 1980, after Nestor H. Fourcade of the Instituto Antartico Argentino, who made detailed geological investigations of Potter Cove and Fildes Peninsula in several seasons, 1957–58 to 1960–61.

Frankenfield Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Frankenfield Glacier is a small glacier in the northeast part of Noville Peninsula, Thurston Island, in Antarctica. It flows east-northeast to the Bellingshausen Sea between Mount Feury and Mulroy Island. The glacier was first roughly delineated from air photos taken by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump in December 1946, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Lieutenant Chester Frankenfield, a meteorologist on the U.S. Navy Bellingshausen Sea Expedition, who established an automated weather station on Thurston Island in February 1960.

Hale Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Hale Glacier is a glacier about 6 nautical miles (11 km) long, located just east of Mount Simpson on Thurston Island, Antarctica, and flowing southwest to the Abbot Ice Shelf in Peacock Sound. It was delineated from air photos taken by U.S. Navy Squadron VX-6 in January 1960, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Lieutenant Bill J. Hale, U.S. Navy, a helicopter pilot aboard USS Burton Island who made exploratory flights to Thurston Island in February 1960.

McManus Glacier glacier in Antarctica

McManus Glacier is a glacier flowing north into Palestrina Glacier, in northwestern Alexander Island, Antarctica. It separates Lassus Mountains on the west from Sofia University Mountains on the east. The glacier was surveyed by the British Antarctic Survey (BAS), 1975–76, and was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1980 after Alan James McManus, a BAS cook at Grytviken and Faraday Research Station, 1971–73, and at Adelaide Island and Rothera Research Station, 1975–78.

Hushen Glacier is a glacier lying at the southwestern part of the base of the Mendelssohn Inlet, an inlet lying between Derocher Peninsula and Eroica Peninsula indenting the north face of Beethoven Peninsula, in the southwestern portion of Alexander Island, Antarctica. The glacier flows northeast while joining Reuning Glacier which discharges into the south part of Mendelssohn Inlet. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from U.S. Navy aerial photographs taken 1967–68 and from Landsat imagery taken 1972–73, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for W. Timothy Hushen, Director of the Polar Research Board at the National Academy of Sciences, 1981–88.

Rignot Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Rignot Glacier is a glacier about 4 nautical miles long draining north from the King Peninsula into Abbot Ice Shelf. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) after Eric Rignot, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, geophysicist; uses field and remotely sensed data to study Antarctic glacier mechanics from the 1990s to the present.

Hinkley Glacier

Hinkley Glacier is a glacier flowing northeastward from Corbet Peak and Schoening Peak, Vinson Massif on the east slope of Sentinel Range in the Ellsworth Mountains, Antarctica, and continuing between Mount Segers and Zinsmeister Ridge to enter Dater Glacier southeast of Nebeska Peak and northwest of Sipey Peak. It was named by US-ACAN (2006) after Todd K. Hinkley, Technical Director, National Ice Core Laboratory, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, CO,2001-06.

References

United States Geological Survey Scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.