Thomson Hankey

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Thomson Hankey (1805 – 13 January 1893) [1] was a British merchant, a banker and a Liberal Party politician.

Liberal Party (UK) political party of the United Kingdom, 1859–1988

The Liberal Party was one of the two major parties in the United Kingdom with the opposing Conservative Party in the 19th and early 20th centuries. The party arose from an alliance of Whigs and free trade-supporting Peelites and the reformist Radicals in the 1850s. By the end of the 19th century, it had formed four governments under William Gladstone. Despite being divided over the issue of Irish Home Rule, the party returned to government in 1905 and then won a landslide victory in the following year's general election.

Hankey was the son of Thomson Hankey from Portland Place in London, and his wife Martha, the daughter of Benjamin Harrison from Clapham Common. [2] He became a merchant in the City of London and a director the Bank of England, [2] serving first as its Deputy Governor [3] and then as its Governor from 1851 to 1853. [4]

Portland Place street in the Marylebone district of central London, England

Portland Place is a street in the Marylebone district of central London. Named for the Third Duke of Portland, the unusually wide street is home to the BBC Broadcasting House, Chinese and Polish embassies, and the Royal Institute of British Architects.

Clapham Common urban park in Clapham, south London

Clapham Common is a large triangular urban park in Clapham, south London. Originally common land for the parishes of Battersea and Clapham, it was converted to parkland under the terms of the Metropolitan Commons Act 1878. It is 220 acres of green space, with three ponds and a Victorian bandstand. It is overlooked by large Georgian and Victorian mansions and nearby Clapham Old Town.

City of London City and county in United Kingdom

The City of London is a city and local government district that contains the historic centre and the primary central business district (CBD) of London. It constituted most of London from its settlement by the Romans in the 1st century AD to the Middle Ages, but the agglomeration has since grown far beyond the City's borders. The City is now only a tiny part of the metropolis of London, though it remains a notable part of central London. Administratively, it forms one of the 33 local authority districts of Greater London; however, the City of London is not a London borough, a status reserved for the other 32 districts. It is also a separate county of England, being an enclave surrounded by Greater London. It is the smallest county in the United Kingdom.

At the 1852 general election, Hankey unsuccessfully contested the borough of Boston in Lincolnshire. [5] He then contested the by-election in June 1853 for the City of Peterborough, where he lost by a margin of 21 votes (out of a total 451) to the Liberal George Hammond Whalley. [6] Whalley had been returned for Peterborough at a by-election in December 1852, but an election petition was lodged and his election was subsequently declared void on 8 June 1853 [1] on the grounds that Whalley had been complicit in the "treating" of voters. After his second by-election win, a further petition was lodged, and a committee of the House of Commons found that Whalley's election was invalid, because he had been disqualified as a result of the previous void election. The seat was therefore awarded to Hankey, who was declared duly elected on 14 August 1853. [7]

1852 United Kingdom general election

The 1852 United Kingdom general election was a watershed in the formation of the modern political parties of Britain. Following 1852, the Tory/Conservative party became, more completely, the party of the rural aristocracy, while the Whig/Liberal party became the party of the rising urban bourgeoisie in Britain. The results of the election were extremely close in terms of both the popular vote and the numbers of seats won by the two main parties.

Boston was a parliamentary borough in Lincolnshire, which elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons from 1547 until 1885, and then one member from 1885 until 1918, when the constituency was abolished.

Peterborough (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1885 onwards

Peterborough is a borough constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Its current form is the direct, unbroken successor of a smaller constituency that was created in the mid-16th century and used for the legislatures of England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom (UK). The seat today elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first-past-the-post system of election since 1885, before which its earlier form had two-member representation using the similar bloc vote system and both forms had a broadening but restricted franchise until 1918.

Hankey was re-elected in 1857, [8] 1859 [9] and 1865, [10] but was defeated at the 1868 general election by the Liberal William Wells. [6] He was re-elected in 1874, [11] but was defeated in 1880. [6] His name was discussed in early 1882 as a possible candidate for any future vacancy in Peterborough, [12] but when Hampden Whalley resigned in June 1883, Hankey did not contest the resulting by-election, [6] and did not stand again thereafter. [13]

1857 United Kingdom general election

In the 1857 United Kingdom general election, the Whigs, led by Lord Palmerston, finally won a majority in the House of Commons as the Conservative vote fell significantly. The election had been provoked by a vote of censure in Palmerston's government over his approach to the Arrow affair which led to the Second Opium War. Aged 72 Palmerston became the oldest person to win a general election for the first time. As of 2019 there has been no person as old as Palmerston to win a general election for the first time.

1859 United Kingdom general election

In the 1859 United Kingdom general election, the minority Conservative government of Earl of Derby failed to achieve a majority of seats in the House of Commons. Despite making overall gains, Derby's government was defeated in a confidence vote by an alliance of the Whigs, led by Lord Palmerston and other political groupings including the Peelites, Radicals and the Irish Brigade. Palmerston subsequently formed a new government from this alliance which is now considered to be the first official Liberal Party administration.

1865 United Kingdom general election

The 1865 United Kingdom general election saw the Liberals, led by Lord Palmerston, increase their large majority over the Earl of Derby's Conservatives to more than 80. The Whig Party changed its name to the Liberal Party between the previous election and this one.

He was also a Justice of the Peace (JP) for Middlesex, Kent and the City of London, and a member of Commission of lieutenancy for the City of London. [13]

Middlesex historic county of England

Middlesex is a historic county in southeast England. Its area is now almost entirely within the wider urbanised area of London. Its area is now also mostly within the ceremonial county of Greater London, with small sections in other neighbouring ceremonial counties. It was established in the Anglo-Saxon system from the territory of the Middle Saxons, and existed as an official administrative unit until 1965. The county is bounded to the south by the River Thames, and includes the rivers Colne and Lea and a ridge of hills as the other boundaries. The largely low-lying county, dominated by clay in its north and alluvium on gravel in its south, was the second smallest by area in 1831.

He died on 13 January 1893, aged 88. [13] In his later years, his advanced age prevented him from taking any active part in public life. [13]

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References

  1. 1 2 Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "P" (part 1)
  2. 1 2 "New Members". The Times . London. 26 February 1874. p. 6.
  3. "Deputy Governors of the Bank of England" (PDF). Bank of England . Retrieved 3 January 2014.[ permanent dead link ]
  4. "Governors of the Bank of England" (PDF). Bank of England. Archived from the original (PDF) on 12 February 2012. Retrieved 17 December 2010.
  5. Craig, F. W. S. (1989) [1977]. British parliamentary election results 1832–1885 (2nd ed.). Chichester: Parliamentary Research Services. p. 55. ISBN   0-900178-26-4.
  6. 1 2 3 4 Craig, pages 237–238
  7. "Election Committee. Peterborough". The Times. London. 15 August 1853. p. 10, col B. Retrieved 18 December 2010.(subscription required)
  8. "No. 21983". The London Gazette . 31 March 1857. p. 1179.
  9. "No. 22258". The London Gazette . 3 May 1859. p. 1813.
  10. "No. 22991". The London Gazette . 14 July 1865. p. 3531.
  11. "No. 24063". The London Gazette . 6 February 1874. p. 539.
  12. "Election Intelligence". The Times. London. 27 February 1882. pp. 7, col G. Retrieved 19 December 2010.(subscription required)
  13. 1 2 3 4 "Obituary. Mr. Thomson Hankey". The Times . London. 16 January 1893. p. 10, col F. Retrieved 19 December 2010.(subscription required)
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
George Hammond Whalley
George Wentworth-FitzWilliam
Member of Parliament for Peterborough
1853–1868
With: George Wentworth-FitzWilliam 1853–59
George Hammond Whalley 1859–68
Succeeded by
William Wells
George Hammond Whalley
Preceded by
William Wells
George Hammond Whalley
Member of Parliament for Peterborough
18741880
With: George Hammond Whalley 1874–78
John Wentworth-FitzWilliam 1878–80
Succeeded by
Hampden Whalley
John Wentworth-FitzWilliam
Government offices
Preceded by
Henry James Prescot
Governor of the Bank of England
1851–1853
Succeeded by
John Hubbard