Thomson MO6

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MO6.jpg
Thomson MO6
Manufacturer Thomson SA
Release date1986;34 years ago (1986)
Discontinued1989;31 years ago (1989)
Operating system BASIC 1.0
CPU Motorola 6809E @ 1MHz
Memory128kB RAM
Graphics8 modes from 160 x 200 to 640 x 200 with 2 to 16 colors (from 4096)

The Thomson MO6 was an 6809E-based computer introduced in France in 1986. [1] It featured 128 KB of RAM, a 40×25 text display, and built-in Microsoft BASIC. The MO6 was available until January 1989.

In Italy it was sold by Olivetti with little aesthetic changes, and named Olivetti Prodest PC128.

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References

  1. "OLD-COMPUTERS.COM : The Museum". www.old-computers.com.