Thomson Massif

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Thomson Massif ( 70°35′S66°48′E / 70.583°S 66.800°E / -70.583; 66.800 Coordinates: 70°35′S66°48′E / 70.583°S 66.800°E / -70.583; 66.800 ) is a rock massif in the Aramis Range, Prince Charles Mountains, from which rise Mount Sundberg and Mount McGregor. Plotted from ANARE (Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions) air photos taken in 1956 and 1960. Named by Antarctic Names Committee of Australia (ANCA) for R.B. Thomson, officer in charge at Wilkes Station in 1962.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Aramis Range is the third range south in the Prince Charles Mountains, situated 11 miles southeast of the Porthos Range and extending for about 30 miles in a southwest-northeast direction. First visited in January 1957 by Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) southern party led by W.G. Bewsher, who named it for a character in Alexandre Dumas' novel The Three Musketeers, the most popular book read on the southern journey.

Prince Charles Mountains mountain range

The Prince Charles Mountains are a major group of mountains in Mac. Robertson Land in Antarctica, including the Athos Range, the Porthos Range, and the Aramis Range. The highest peak is Mount Menzies. Other prominent peaks are Mount Izabelle and Mount Stinear. These mountains together with other scattered peaks form an arc about 260 miles long, extending from the vicinity of Mount Starlight in the north to Goodspeed Nunataks in the south.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Thomson Massif" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

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The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


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Mount Abbs is, at 7,005 feet (2,135 m), the most prominent peak in the central part of Aramis Range, Prince Charles Mountains, situated just west of Thomson Massif. Discovered by ANARE southern party led by W.G. Bewsher in December 1956. Named by ANCA after Gordon Abbs, radio operator at Mawson Station in 1956.

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Mount Butterworth is a mountain consisting of four peaks and a long, low ridge extending in an east-west direction, situated 5 nautical miles (9 km) south of Thomson Massif in the Aramis Range, Prince Charles Mountains. It was plotted from Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions air photos taken in 1956 and 1960, and named by the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia for G. Butterworth, a radio officer at Wilkes Station in 1963 and at Mawson Station in 1966.

Mount Canham is a mountain at the north end of the Bennett Escarpment, about 2 nautical miles (4 km) south of Corry Massif, in the Porthos Range of the Prince Charles Mountains. The feature was plotted from Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions air photos of 1965, and named by the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia for J.R. Canham, officer in charge at Wilkes Station in 1967.

White Massif is a rock massif about 3 nautical miles (6 km) east-northeast of Thomson Massif in the Aramis Range, Prince Charles Mountains. Plotted from ANARE air photos taken in 1956 and 1960. Named by Antarctic Names Committee of Australia (ANCA) for R.F. White, senior technician (electronics) at Mawson Station in 1963 who died there on October 18, 1963.

Mount Sundberg is a pyramidal peak surmounting the central part of Thomson Massif in the Aramis Range, Prince Charles Mountains. First visited in December 1956 by the ANARE southern party led by W.G. Bewsher. Named by Antarctic Names Committee of Australia (ANCA) for Sgt. G. Sundberg, engine fitter with the RAAF Antarctic Flight at Mawson Station in 1956.

Peacock Ridge is a ridge standing between Mount Soucek and Mount Porteus, in the north part of the Tula Mountains in Enderby Land, Antarctica. Plotted from air photos taken from ANARE aircraft in 1956. Named by Antarctic Names Committee of Australia (ANCA) for D. Peacock, a member of the crew of the Discovery during the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE), 1929-31.

The Hall Nunataks are a group of four nunataks about 6 nautical miles (11 km) east-southeast of Mount Bunt in the Aramis Range of the Prince Charles Mountains, Antarctica. They were plotted from Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions air photos taken in 1960, and were named by the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia for R.G. Hall, an assistant diesel mechanic at Wilkes Station in 1964.

Saxton Ridge is a mountain ridge just south of Thomson Massif in the Aramis Range, Prince Charles Mountains. Plotted from ANARE air photos taken in 1956. Named by Antarctic Names Committee of Australia (ANCA) for R.A. Saxton, officer in charge at Wilkes Station in 1963.

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