Thomson Peak

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Thomson Peak ( 71°59′S166°7′E / 71.983°S 166.117°E / -71.983; 166.117 Coordinates: 71°59′S166°7′E / 71.983°S 166.117°E / -71.983; 166.117 ) is a peak (2,350 m) situated 11 nautical miles (20 km) southeast of Mount Shute at the extreme south limit of Mirabito Range. Named by the northern party of New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZGSAE), 1963–64, for Robert B. Thomson of New Zealand, scientific leader at Hallett Station, 1960; officer-in-charge at Wilkes Station, 1962; deputy leader at Scott base, 1963–64.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Mount Shute is a mountain (2,070 m) standing 14 miles (22 km) southeast of Austin Peak in Mirabito Range, Antarctica. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos 1960 63. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Larry R. Shute, United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) meteorologist at Hallett Station, 1963–64.

Mirabito Range is a narrow, northwest-trending mountain range, 64 km (40 mi) long and 6 km (4 mi) wide, standing between the upper part of Lillie Glacier and the Greenwell Glacier in northern Victoria Land, Antarctica. The range is part of the Concord Mountains.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Thomson Peak" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


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Inferno Peak is a peak 3 miles (5 km) north of Le Couteur Peak in the northern end of the Millen Range, Antarctica. It was so named by the southern party of the New Zealand Federated Mountain Clubs Antarctic Expedition (NZFMCAE), 1962–63, because geologic examination showed it contained the granite/greywacke contact, with baking of the sedimentary rock imparting a reddish color to the peak.

Explorers Range

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Austin Peak is a peak in the east-central portion of the Mirabito Range in Victoria Land, Antarctica. The geographical feature was so named by the northern party of the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition, 1963–64, for William T. Austin, United States Antarctic Research Program Representative at McMurdo Station, 1963–64, who organized support for the New Zealand field parties. The peak lies on the Pennell Coast, a minor portion of Antarctica lying between Cape Williams and Cape Adare.

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Bounty Nunatak is a prominent, largely ice-free nunatak, 2,350 metres (7,700 ft) high, located 4 nautical miles (7 km) southeast of Mount Burnham in the southern part of the Daniels Range, Usarp Mountains. The name was applied by the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition, 1963–64, because the party was out of food upon arrival at a food and fuel cache established near this nunatak.

Bramble Peak is a peak, 2,560 metres (8,400 ft) high, that surmounts the northeast side of the head of Croll Glacier, in the Victory Mountains, Victoria Land. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and from U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–64, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Edward J. Bramble, a U.S. Navy aviation machinist's mate with Squadron VX-6 at McMurdo Station, 1967.

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Miller Peak is a peak, 2,420 metres (7,940 ft) high, located 2 nautical miles (4 km) south of Mount Ford in the Explorers Range of the Bowers Mountains, Antarctica. It was explored by the northern party of the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition of 1963–64, and was named for J.H. "Bob" Miller, the leader-surveyor of that party.

Takrouna Bluff is a small but prominent bluff on the east side of Alamein Range in the Freyberg Mountains, overlooking Canham Glacier from a position 6 nautical miles (11 km) west-southwest of Galatos Peak. Named by the northern party of New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZGSAE), 1963–64, after Takrouna, a similar feature in Tunisia associated with Lord Freyberg and the Second New Zealand Expeditionary Force during World War II.

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Mount McCallum is a peak rising to about 2,200 metres (7,200 ft) immediately northwest of the 2,590-metre (8,500 ft) Mount Marwick, in the Explorers Range of the Bowers Mountains in Antarctica. Following a proposal by M.G. Laird, leader of a New Zealand Antarctic Research Programme geological party to the area, 1981–82, the mountain was named after New Zealand scientist and mountaineer G. McCallum, who worked in Antarctica in the 1963–64 season, and who perished in an avalanche on Mount Ruapehu, New Zealand, in 1981.

Mount Mackellar is a massive mountain, 4,295 metres (14,090 ft) high, standing at the head of Mackellar Glacier, 3 nautical miles (6 km) south of Pagoda Peak, in the Queen Alexandra Range, Antarctica. It was discovered by the British Antarctic Expedition, 1907–09, and named after Campbell Mackellar, a supporter of the expedition.

Toilers Mountain is a massive peak (1,955 m) standing 4 nautical miles (7 km) northeast of Halverson Peak in the northwest end of the King Range, Concord Mountains. The peak was used as a gravity station by the northern party of New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZGSAE), 1963–64. So named by them because of the long climb and unpleasant conditions encountered in occupying the summit.

Red Rock Peak is a peak rising to 2,000 m about 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) north-northwest of Thomson Peak in the south part of Mirabito Range, Victoria Land. The name is descriptive of the rock at the peak and was given by Bradley Field, geologist, New Zealand Geological Survey, a member of a New Zealand Antarctic Research Program (NZARP) geological party to the area, 1980–81.