Thomson Point

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Thomson Point ( 60°43′S44°38′W / 60.717°S 44.633°W / -60.717; -44.633 Coordinates: 60°43′S44°38′W / 60.717°S 44.633°W / -60.717; -44.633 ) is a point on the east side of Pirie Peninsula, 1.7 nautical miles (3.1 km) southeast of Cape Mabel, on the north coast of Laurie Island in the South Orkney Islands. Charted in 1903 by the Scottish National Antarctic Expedition under William Speirs Bruce, who named it for J.A. (later Sir Arthur) Thomson, regius professor of natural history, University of Aberdeen, Scotland.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Pirie Peninsula is a narrow peninsula extending 6 km (3.7 mi) northward from the center of Laurie Island, in the South Orkney Islands of Antarctica. The peninsula was surveyed in 1903 by the Scottish National Antarctic Expedition under Bruce, who named it for Dr Harvey Pirie, surgeon and geologist of the expedition.

Cape Mabel is a cape forming the northern tip of Pirie Peninsula on the north coast of Laurie Island, in the South Orkney Islands, Antarctica. It was probably first seen by the British sealing expedition under James Weddell, who examined the north coast of Laurie Island in 1823. The cape was charted in 1903 by the Scottish National Antarctic Expedition under William Speirs Bruce, who named it for the wife of J.H. Harvey Pirie, the surgeon-geologist to the expedition.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Thomson Point" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

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Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


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