Thor Ørvig

Last updated
Olympic medal record
Men's sailing
Representing Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1920 Antwerp 12 metre class (1919 rating)

Thor Ørvig (December 14, 1891 – June 17, 1965) was a Norwegian sailor who competed in the 1920 Summer Olympics.

Norway constitutional monarchy in Northern Europe

Norway, officially the Kingdom of Norway, is a Nordic country in Northwestern Europe whose territory comprises the western and northernmost portion of the Scandinavian Peninsula; the remote island of Jan Mayen and the archipelago of Svalbard are also part of the Kingdom of Norway. The Antarctic Peter I Island and the sub-Antarctic Bouvet Island are dependent territories and thus not considered part of the kingdom. Norway also lays claim to a section of Antarctica known as Queen Maud Land.

Sailor person who navigates water-borne vessels or assists in doing so

A sailor, seaman, mariner, or seafarer is a person who works aboard a watercraft as part of its crew, and may work in any one in a number of different fields that are related to the operation and maintenance of a ship.

1920 Summer Olympics games of the VII Olympiad, celebrated in Antwerp, Belgium, in 1920

The 1920 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the VII Olympiad, were an international multi-sport event in 1920 in Antwerp, Belgium.

He was a crew member of the Norwegian boat Heira II, which won the gold medal in the 12 metre class (1919 rating).


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