Thor Island (Antarctica)

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Thor Island ( 64°33′S62°0′W / 64.550°S 62.000°W / -64.550; -62.000 Coordinates: 64°33′S62°0′W / 64.550°S 62.000°W / -64.550; -62.000 ) is the largest of a group of small islands lying at the east side of Foyn Harbor in Wilhelmina Bay, off the west coast of Graham Land. The island was named South Thor Island by whalers in 1921-22 because the whaling factory Thor I was moored to it during that season (the island to the northeast was called North Thor Island). In 1960 the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) limited the name Thor to the island actually used by the ship; the other island was left unnamed.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Foyn Harbor harbor

Foyn Harbor is an anchorage between Nansen Island and Enterprise Island in Wilhelmina Bay, off the west coast of Graham Land, Antarctica. It was surveyed by M.C. Lester and T.W. Bagshawe in 1921–22, and was named by whalers in the area after the whaling factory Svend Foyn, which was moored here during 1921–22.

Wilhelmina Bay bay

Wilhelmina Bay is a bay 24 kilometres (15 mi) wide between the Reclus Peninsula and Cape Anna along the west coast of Graham Land on the Antarctic Peninsula. It was discovered by the Belgian Antarctic Expedition of 1897-99 led by Adrien de Gerlache. The bay is named for Wilhelmina, Queen of the Netherlands, who reigned from 1890 to 1948.

See also

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Thor Island" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


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