Thore Myrvang

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Thore Embretsen Myrvang (21 January 1858 – 9 July 1939) was a Norwegian educator and politician for the Liberal Party and the Labour Democrats.

Liberal Party (Norway) Norwegian political party

The Liberal Party is a social-liberal political party in Norway. The party is the oldest in Norway, and has enacted reforms such as parliamentarism, freedom of religion, universal suffrage and state schooling. For most of the late 19th and early 20th century, it was Norway's largest and dominant political party, but in the postwar era it lost most of its support and became a relatively small party. The party has nevertheless participated in several centrist and centre-right government coalitions in the postwar era. It currently holds eight seats in the Parliament, and is also a part of Norway's government together with the Conservative Party and the Progress Party. Since 2010, the leader of the party is Trine Skei Grande.

The Radical People's Party, founded as the Labour Democrats, was a radical political party in Norway mainly active from 1906 to 1936, targeting workers and smallholders. The party was founded by Johan Castberg, who led the party until his death in 1926.

He was born in Tynset as a son of farmers Embret Thoresen Myrvang (1828–1884) and Gisken Krogseng (1829–1922). He took teacher's education at Hamar Seminary in 1877, and was a teacher in Stor-Elvdal until 1916. He also owned the farm Westgård from 1896. From 1911 to 1915 he was the acting school director of the Diocese of Hamar, being a substitute for Olav Andreas Eftestøl who was an MP. [1]

Tynset Municipality in Hedmark, Norway

Tynset is a municipality in Hedmark county, Norway. It is part of the traditional region of Østerdalen. The administrative centre of the municipality is the village of Tynset.

Stor-Elvdal Municipality in Hedmark, Norway

Stor-Elvdal is a municipality in Hedmark county, Norway. It is part of the traditional region of Østerdalen. The administrative centre of the municipality is the village of Koppang.

Diocese of Hamar

The Diocese of Hamar is one of the dioceses that make up the Church of Norway. The diocese of Hamar covers the churches of Oppland and Hedmark. There are 164 parishes in the diocese. Hamar Cathedral in the city of Hamar is the seat of the Diocese of Hamar.

Myrvang served as mayor of Stor-Elvdal from 1901 to 1904, 1913 to 1916 and 1922 to 1925. During the last period he also chaired the county council (which was composed of mayors). He then represented the Labour Democrats, which he joined after the split from the Liberal Party. For both these parties, he served a total of six terms in the Parliament of Norway. The first five terms were continuous, with Myrvang winning elections in 1894, 1897, 1900, 1903 and 1906. [1] On the latter occasion, the system with single-member constituencies had been implemented, and Myrvang won because he gathered the social democratic vote. [2]

A County council is the highest governing body of the county municipalities in Norway. The county council sets the scope of the county municipal activity. The council is led by a chairman or county mayor (fylkesordfører). Members of the council are elected for a four-year term through the general local elections. It is common for members of a county council to also hold seats in municipal councils, but very rare that they also hold legislative (Storting) or other government office, without a leave of absence.

1894 Norwegian parliamentary election

Parliamentary elections were held in Norway in 1894. The result was a victory for the Liberal Party, which won 59 of the 114 seats in the Storting.

1897 Norwegian parliamentary election

Parliamentary elections were held in Norway in 1897. The result was a victory for the Liberal Party, which won 79 of the 114 seats in the Storting.

In 1912 he was elected as the deputy of Olav Andreas Eftestøl in Søndre Østerdalen, [3] whereas in 1915 he was elected to his sixth and last term, with K. K. Sanaker as his deputy. [1] [4] In 1918, the last election with single-member constituencies, he lost to Johan Bondesen, social democrat from Stor-Elvdal. [5] In 1921 Myrvang headed the party ballot in the plural-member constituency Hedmark, [6] whereas in 1924 he was the second candidate on a joint list with the Liberal Party, [7] both times without being elected.

1912 Norwegian parliamentary election

Parliamentary elections were held in Norway on 21 October 1912, with a second round held between 4 and 11 November. The result was a victory for the alliance of the Liberal Party and the Labour Democrats, which won 76 of the 123 seats in the Storting.

1915 Norwegian parliamentary election

Parliamentary elections were held in Norway on 21 October 1915, with a second round between 4 and 11 November. The result was a victory for the Liberal Party, which won 74 of the 123 seats in the Storting.

1918 Norwegian parliamentary election

Parliamentary elections were held in Norway on 21 October 1918, with a second round between 4 and 11 November. The result was a victory for the Liberal Party, which won 51 of the 123 seats in the Storting. Despite receiving the most votes, the Labour Party won just 18 seats, a loss of one seat compared with the 1915 elections.

Among his other posts, Myrvang chaired the county school board of Hedmark from 1924 to 1930, and also chaired the Norwegian Farmers and Smallholders Union. [1]

The Norwegian Farmers and Smallholders Union is a Norwegian interest organization for farmers.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 "Thore Myrvang" (in Norwegian). Norwegian Social Science Data Services (NSD). Retrieved 9 January 2012.
  2. "Norges Offisielle Statistikk. V. 49. Stortingsvalget 1906" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Statistics Norway.
  3. "Norges Offisielle Statistikk. V. 189. Stortingsvalget 1912" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Statistics Norway.
  4. "Norges Offisielle Statistikk. VI. 65. Stortingsvalget 1915" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Statistics Norway.
  5. "Norges Offisielle Statistikk. VI. 150. Stortingsvalget 1918" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Statistics Norway.
  6. "Norges Offisielle Statistikk. VII. 66. Stortingsvalget 1921" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Statistics Norway.
  7. "Norges Offisielle Statistikk. VII. 176. Stortingsvalget 1924" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Statistics Norway.