Thoreau (disambiguation)

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Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862) was an American author, naturalist, transcendentalist, tax resister, development critic, and philosopher.

Henry David Thoreau American poet, essayist, naturalist, and abolitionist (1817–1862)

Henry David Thoreau was an American essayist, poet, philosopher, abolitionist, naturalist, tax resister, development critic, surveyor, and historian. A leading transcendentalist, Thoreau is best known for his book Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay "Civil Disobedience", an argument for disobedience to an unjust state.

Thoreau may refer to:

Thoreau, New Mexico CDP in New Mexico, United States

Thoreau is a census-designated place (CDP) in McKinley County, New Mexico, United States. The population was 1,863 at the 2000 census. It is majority Native American, primarily of the Navajo Nation, as this community is located within its boundaries.

Thoreau MacDonald Canadian artist

Thoreau MacDonald was a Canadian artist, book illustrator and art editor.

People with the surname Thoreau:

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Related Research Articles

Civil disobedience active, professed refusal to obey certain laws, demands, and commands of a government, or of an occupying international power

Civil disobedience is the active, professed refusal of a citizen to obey certain laws, demands, orders or commands of a government or occupying international power. Civil disobedience is sometimes defined as having to be nonviolent to be called civil disobedience. Civil disobedience is sometimes, therefore, equated with nonviolent resistance.

<i>A Plea for Captain John Brown</i> book by Henry David Thoreau

A Plea for Captain John Brown is an essay by Henry David Thoreau. It is based on a speech Thoreau first delivered to an audience at Concord, Massachusetts on October 30, 1859, two weeks after John Brown's raid on Harpers Ferry, and repeated several times before Brown's execution on December 2, 1859. It was later published as a part of Echoes of Harper's Ferry in 1860.

<i>Walden</i> book by Henry David Thoreau

Walden is a book by transcendentalist Henry David Thoreau. The text is a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings. The work is part personal declaration of independence, social experiment, voyage of spiritual discovery, satire, and—to some degree—a manual for self-reliance.

Walden Pond body of water in Massachusetts where Henry David Thoreau once lived

Walden Pond is a lake in Concord, Massachusetts, in the United States. A famous example of a kettle hole, it was formed by retreating glaciers 10,000–12,000 years ago. The pond is protected as part of Walden Pond State Reservation, a 335-acre (136 ha) state park and recreation site managed by the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation. The reservation was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1962 for its association with the writer Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862), whose two years living in a cabin on its shore provided the foundation for his most famous work, Walden; or, Life in the Woods.

<i>Civil Disobedience</i> (Thoreau) literary work

Resistance to Civil Government is an essay by American transcendentalist Henry David Thoreau that was first published in 1849. In it, Thoreau argues that individuals should not permit governments to overrule or atrophy their consciences, and that they have a duty to avoid allowing such acquiescence to enable the government to make them the agents of injustice. Thoreau was motivated in part by his disgust with slavery and the Mexican–American War (1846–1848).

Thoreau Society

The Thoreau Society is a literary society devoted to the works of Henry David Thoreau, it is based in Concord, Massachusetts, USA. Established in 1941, it has long contributed to the dissemination of knowledge about Henry David Thoreau by collecting books, manuscripts, and artifacts relating to Thoreau and his contemporaries, by encouraging the use of its collections, and by publishing articles in two Society periodicals.

<i>Slavery in Massachusetts</i>

Slavery in Massachusetts is an 1854 essay by Henry David Thoreau based on a speech he gave at an anti-slavery rally at Framingham, Massachusetts, on July 4, 1854, after the re-enslavement in Boston, Massachusetts of fugitive slave Anthony Burns.

<i>The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail</i>

The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail is a two-act American play by Robert E. Lee and Jerome Lawrence written in 1969. Hal B. Wallis is producer of the film based on the play, for which both Lawrence and Lee wrote the screenplay. The play is based on the early life of the title character, Henry David Thoreau, leading up to his night spent in a jail in Concord, Massachusetts. Thoreau was jailed for refusing to pay a poll tax on the grounds that the money might be used to pay for the Mexican–American War, which he opposed.

The North Fork of the East Branch of the Pemigewasset River is a 6.9-mile-long (11.1 km) river located in the White Mountains of New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the East Branch of the Pemigewasset River, part of the Merrimack River watershed.

<i>Thomas Carlyle and His Works</i>

Thomas Carlyle and His Works is an essay written by Henry David Thoreau that praises the writings of Thomas Carlyle.

<i>Remarks After the Hanging of John Brown</i>

Remarks After the Hanging of John Brown was a speech given by Henry David Thoreau on December 2, 1859, at the time of John Brown's execution. Thoreau gave a few brief remarks of his own, read poetry by Sir Walter Raleigh, William Collins, Friedrich Schiller, William Wordsworth, Alfred Tennyson, George Chapman, and Henry Wotton, and then quoted from his own translation of Tacitus.

<i>The Last Days of John Brown</i>

The Last Days of John Brown is an essay by Henry David Thoreau, written in 1860, that praised the executed abolitionist militia leader John Brown.

<i>A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers</i> book by Henry David Thoreau

A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849) is a book by Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862). It is ostensibly the narrative of a boat trip from Concord, Massachusetts to Concord, New Hampshire, and back, that Thoreau took with his brother John in 1839. John died of tetanus in 1842 and Thoreau wrote the book, in part, as a tribute to his memory.

Chesuncook Lake is a reservoir in the North Maine Woods and Piscataquis County, Maine. It is formed by the damming of the West Branch Penobscot River, by dams built in 1835, 1903, and 1916. It is approximately 22 miles (35 km) long and 1–4 miles wide, with a surface area of 25,183 acres (101.91 km2) and a maximum depth of 150 feet (46 m). It is the third-largest body of fresh water in Maine.

Thoreau–Alcott House

The Thoreau–Alcott House is a historic house at 255 Main Street in Concord, Massachusetts, United States that was home to the writers Henry David Thoreau and Louisa May Alcott at different times.

Fairhaven Bay

Fairhaven Bay is a bay located within the Sudbury river in Concord, Massachusetts, United States (US). It was frequented by David Henry Thoreau who, together with Edward Hoar, accidentally set fire to the woods near the bay in April 1844, as later described in Thoreau's journal.

Anti-statism opposition to state intervention into personal, social, and economic affairs

Anti-statism is opposition to state intervention into personal, social and economic affairs. Anti-statism means opposition to the state and any artificial form of government and it differs from traditional anarchism which means the opposition not only to the state, but to any form of rulership.