Thoreau MacDonald

Last updated
Thoreau MacDonald at his home in Thornhill, c. 1950 Thoreau MacDonald, son of Group of Seven Artist J.E.H. MacDonald, at his home in Thornhill, c1950.jpg
Thoreau MacDonald at his home in Thornhill, c.1950

Thoreau MacDonald (April 21, 1901 at Toronto, Ontario – May 30, 1989 at Toronto) [1] was a Canadian [2] artist, book illustrator and art editor. [3]

Toronto Provincial capital city in Ontario, Canada

Toronto is the provincial capital of Ontario and the most populous city in Canada, with a population of 2,731,571 in 2016. Current to 2016, the Toronto census metropolitan area (CMA), of which the majority is within the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), held a population of 5,928,040, making it Canada's most populous CMA. The city is the anchor of the Golden Horseshoe, an urban agglomeration of 9,245,438 people surrounding the western end of Lake Ontario. Toronto is an international centre of business, finance, arts, and culture, and is recognized as one of the most multicultural and cosmopolitan cities in the world.

Ontario Province of Canada

Ontario is one of the 13 provinces and territories of Canada. Located in Central Canada, it is Canada's most populous province accounting for 38.3 percent of the country's population, and is the second-largest province in total area. Ontario is fourth-largest jurisdiction in total area when the territories of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut are included. It is home to the nation's capital city, Ottawa, and the nation's most populous city, Toronto, which is also Ontario's provincial capital.

Canadians citizens of Canada

Canadians are people identified with the country of Canada. This connection may be residential, legal, historical or cultural. For most Canadians, several of these connections exist and are collectively the source of their being Canadian.

Contents

MacDonald was the son of Group of Seven member J. E. H. MacDonald. He was mainly self-taught, but he did work with his father. MacDonald was colour blind and as a result he worked primarily in black and white. [4]

Group of Seven (artists) group of Canadian landscape painters

The Group of Seven, also sometimes known as the Algonquin School, was a group of Canadian landscape painters from 1920 to 1933, originally consisting of Franklin Carmichael (1890–1945), Lawren Harris (1885–1970), A. Y. Jackson (1882–1974), Frank Johnston (1888–1949), Arthur Lismer (1885–1969), J. E. H. MacDonald (1873–1932), and Frederick Varley (1881–1969). Later, A. J. Casson (1898–1992) was invited to join in 1926, Edwin Holgate (1892–1977) became a member in 1930, and LeMoine FitzGerald (1890–1956) joined in 1932.

J. E. H. MacDonald Canadian artist

James Edward Hervey MacDonald was an English-Canadian artist and one of the founders of the Group of Seven who initiated the first major Canadian national art movement. He was the father of illustrator Thoreau MacDonald.

Color blindness Inability or decreased ability to see colour or colour differences

Color blindness, also known as color vision deficiency, is the decreased ability to see color or differences in color. Simple tasks such as selecting ripe fruit, choosing clothing, and reading traffic lights can be more challenging. Color blindness may also make some educational activities more difficult. However, problems are generally minor, and most people find that they can adapt. People with total color blindness (achromatopsia) may also have decreased visual acuity and be uncomfortable in bright environments.

As an illustrator, MacDonald worked for the Ryerson Press and Canadian Forum magazine. His work is found in the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa, Hart House at the University of Toronto, the Art Gallery of Ontario, and the McMichael Canadian Art Collection amongst other collections.

Ryerson Press was a Canadian book publishing company, active from 1919 to 1970. First established by the Methodist Book Room, a division of the Methodist Church of Canada, and operated by the United Church Publishing House after the Methodist Church's merger into the United Church of Canada in 1925, the imprint specialized in historical, educational and literary titles.

The Canadian Forum was a left-wing literary, cultural and political publication and Canada's longest running continually published political magazine (1920–2000).

National Gallery of Canada National art museum in Ottawa, Canada

The National Gallery of Canada, located in the capital city of Ottawa, Ontario, is Canada's national art museum. The gallery has 12,400 square metres (133,000 sq ft) of physical space,making it one of the largest art museums in North America. The museum's collection includes works from European, American, and Asian, Canadian, and indigenous Canadian artists.

His former home and 4-acre (16,000 m2) garden in Vaughan, Ontario, which he inherited from his father, was donated to the City of Vaughan in 1974. The building and grounds have been restored and are open to the public. [5]

Artworks

McMichael Canadian Art Collection

The McMichael Canadian Art Collection is an art gallery in Kleinburg, Ontario, Canada, northwest of Toronto. It houses an extensive collection of paintings by Tom Thomson, the Group of Seven and their contemporaries, and First Nations and Inuit artists.

Kleinburg Unincorporated community in Ontario, Canada

Kleinburg is an unincorporated village in the city of Vaughan, Ontario, Canada. It is home to the McMichael Canadian Art Collection, an art gallery with a focus on the Group of Seven, and the Kortright Centre for Conservation. In 2001, the village and its surrounding communities had a population of 4,595; the village itself has 282 dwellings, with a population of 952. Kleinburg comprises a narrow section of hilly landscape situated between two branches of the Humber River. The historic village is bounded by Highway 27 on the west and Stegman’s Mill Road to the east. Kleinburg has subsumed the nearby hamlet of Nashville.

Tom Thomson Canadian painter (1877–1917)

Thomas John Thomson was a Canadian artist active in the early 20th century. During his short career he produced roughly 400 oil sketches on small wood panels along with around 50 larger works on canvas. His works consist almost entirely of landscapes depicting trees, skies, lakes, and rivers. His paintings use broad brush strokes and a liberal application of paint to capture the beauty and colour of the Ontario landscape. Thomson's accidental death at 39 by drowning came shortly before the founding of the Group of Seven and is seen as a tragedy for Canadian art.

Related Research Articles

Thornhill, Ontario Suburban district in York, Ontario, Canada

Thornhill is a suburban community in the Regional Municipality of York in Ontario, Canada. It is split between the cities of Vaughan and Markham, lying along the north border of Toronto, centred on Yonge Street. Once a police village, Thornhill is now a community and postal designation. According to the 2001 Census, Thornhill-Vaughan's population was 56,361, and the population of Thornhill-Markham was 47,333. It is immediately south and south-west of Richmond Hill.

Art Gallery of Ontario Art museum in Toronto, Ontario

The Art Gallery of Ontario is an art museum in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The collection includes over 98,000 works spanning the first century to the present day. The gallery has 45,000 square metres (480,000 sq ft) of physical space, making it one of the largest art museums in North America. The museum collection includes a number works from Canadian, First Nations, Inuit, African, European, and Oceanic artists. In addition to exhibits for its collection, the museum has organized and hosted a number of significant travelling arts exhibitions.

A. Y. Jackson Canadian painter

Alexander Young Jackson was a Canadian painter and a founding member of the Group of Seven. Jackson made a significant contribution to the development of art in Canada, and was successful in bringing together the artists of Montreal and Toronto. He exhibited with the Group of Seven from 1920. In addition to his work with the Group of Seven, his long career included serving as a war artist during World War I (1917–19) and teaching at the Banff School of Fine Arts, from 1943 to 1949. In his later years he was artist-in-residence at the McMichael Gallery in Kleinburg, Ontario.

Lawren Harris Canadian painter

Lawren Stewart Harris was a Canadian painter. He was born in Brantford, Ontario, and is best known as a member of the Group of Seven who pioneered a distinctly Canadian painting style in the early twentieth century. A. Y. Jackson has been quoted as saying that Harris provided the stimulus for the Group of Seven. During the 1920s, Harris' works became more abstract and simplified, especially his stark landscapes of the Canadian north and Arctic. He also stopped signing and dating his works so that people would judge his works on their own merit and not by the artist or when they were painted. In 1969, he was made a Companion of the Order of Canada.

Franklin Carmichael 20th-century Canadian artist

Franklin Carmichael was a Canadian artist and member of the Group of Seven. Though he was primarily famous for his use of watercolours, he also used oil paints, charcoal and other mediums to capture the Ontario landscapes of which he was fond. Besides his work as a painter, he worked as a designer and illustrator, creating promotional brochures, advertisements in newspapers and magazines, and stylizing books. Near the end of his life, Carmichael taught in the Graphic Design and Commercial Art Department at the Ontario College of Art.

William Cruikshank was a British painter and the grand-nephew of George Cruikshank. He studied art at the Royal Scottish Academy in Edinburgh, at the Royal Academy in London, and in Paris. His last studies were interrupted by the Franco-Prussian War.

<i>The West Wind</i> (painting) painting by Tom Thomson

The West Wind is a 1917 painting by Canadian artist Tom Thomson. An iconic image, the pine at its centre has been described as growing "in the national ethos as our one and only tree in a country of trees". It was painted in the last year of Thomson's life and was one of his final works on canvas.

Joan Murray (art historian) Canadian art historian

Joan Arden Charlat Murray, is a Canadian writer, independent curator and art historian. Her curatorial projects are wide-ranging and cover a wide spectrum of the visual arts in Canada: contemporary, modern, historical, regional, national and interdisciplinary: she has a special interest in Tom Thomson, the Group of Seven, abstraction and women artists. She is the author of many books, catalogues and articles as well as being a former Gallery curator and director, having worked at institutions such as the Art Gallery of Ontario (1968–1973), The Robert McLaughlin Gallery in Oshawa (1974–1999) and the McMichael Canadian Art Gallery in Kleinburg (2005–2006).

Rosemary Kilbourn is a Canadian printmaker, illustrator and stained glass artist known for her work in wood engraving.

<i>Fine Weather, Georgian Bay</i> painting by J.E.H. MacDonald

Fine Weather, Georgian Bay is a 1913 oil painting by J.E.H. MacDonald. It is in the collection of the Art Gallery of Ontario located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Owen Staples

Owen Staples, also known as Owen Poe Staples, was a Canadian painter, etcher, pastelist, political cartoonist, author, musician and naturalist.

<i>Northern River</i> (painting) painting by Tom Thomson

Northern River is a 1914–15 oil painting by Canadian painter Tom Thomson. The work was inspired by a sketch completed over the same winter, possibly in Algonquin Park. The completed canvas is large, measuring 115.1 × 102.0 cm. Painted over the winter of 1914–15, it was completed in Thomson's shack behind the Studio Building in Toronto. The painting was produced as he was entering the peak of his short art career and is considered one of his most notable works. In 1915 it was purchased by the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa and has remained in the collection ever since.

Death and legacy of Tom Thomson

The death of Tom Thomson, the Canadian painter, occurred on 8 July 1917, on Canoe Lake in Algonquin Provincial Park in Nipissing District, Ontario, Canada. After Thomson drowned in the water, his upturned canoe was discovered later that afternoon and his body eight days later. Many theories regarding Thomson's death—including that he was murdered or committed suicide—have become popular in the years since his death, though these ideas lack any substantiation.

Artistic development of Tom Thomson

Tom Thomson (1877–1917) was a Canadian painter from the beginning of the 20th century. Beginning from humble roots, his development as a career painter was meteoric, only pursuing it seriously in the final years of his life. He became one of the foremost figures in Canadian art, leaving behind around 400 small oil sketches and around fifty larger works on canvas many of which reside in the Tom Thompson art gallery in Owen sound.

<i>Spring Ice</i> painting by Tom Thomson

Spring Ice is a 1915–16 oil painting by Canadian painter Tom Thomson. The work was inspired by a sketch completed on Canoe Lake in Algonquin Park. The completed canvas is large, measuring 72.0 × 102.3 cm. Painted over the winter of 1915–16, it was completed in Thomson's shack behind the Studio Building in Toronto. The painting was produced as he was in the peak of his short art career and is considered one of his most notable works. While exhibited in a show put on by the Ontario Society of Artists, the work received mixed to positive reviews. In 1916 it was purchased by the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa and has remained in the collection ever since.

<i>Drowned Land</i> 1912 oil sketch by Canadian painter Tom Thomson

Drowned Land is a 1912 oil sketch by the 20th-century Canadian painter Tom Thomson.

References

Footnotes

  1. MacDonald told Toronto art collectors that this painting depicted him. [6]

Citations

  1. "Thoreau MacDonald | The Canadian Encyclopedia". www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca. Retrieved 2018-12-02.
  2. "Thoreau MacDonald". www.gallery.ca. Retrieved 2018-12-02.
  3. Furness, Amy Marshall; Fitzgibbon, Gary (2003). "Description & Finding Aid: Thoreau MacDonald Collection CA OTAG SC104" (PDF). Art Gallery of Ontario. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2003. Retrieved December 2, 2018.
  4. "Thoreau MacDonald | The Canadian Encyclopedia". www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca. Retrieved 2018-12-02.
  5. City of Vaughan, "J.E.H./Thoreau MacDonald House" Archived 2011-06-12 at the Wayback Machine
  6. Murray, Joan (2016). "Day Dreaming, Winter 1913–15". Tom Thomson Catalogue Raisonné.