Thoriosa spinivulva

Last updated

Thoriosa spinivulva
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Subphylum: Chelicerata
Class: Arachnida
Order: Araneae
Infraorder: Araneomorphae
Family: Ctenidae
Genus: Thoriosa
Species:
T. spinivulva
Binomial name
Thoriosa spinivulva
Simon, 1910

Thoriosa spinivulva is a spider species of the family Ctenidae that is endemic on São Tomé Island. It was first named in 1910 by Eugène Simon. [1]

São Tomé Island island

São Tomé Island, at 854 km2 (330 sq mi), is the largest island of São Tomé and Príncipe and is home to about 157,000 or 96% of the nation's population. The island is divided into six districts. It is located 2 km north of the equator.

Eugène Simon French naturalist

Eugène Louis Simon was a French naturalist who worked particularly on insects and spiders, but also on birds and plants. He is by far the most prolific spider taxonomist in history, describing over 4,000 species.

Its male holotype measures from 11 to 12 mm and its female holotype measures from 8 to 10 mm. [2]

Related Research Articles

Wolf spider family of spiders

Wolf spiders are members of the family Lycosidae, from the Ancient Greek word "λύκος" meaning "wolf". They are robust and agile hunters with excellent eyesight. They live mostly in solitude and hunt alone, and do not spin webs. Some are opportunistic hunters pouncing upon prey as they find it or even chasing it over short distances. Some wait for passing prey in or near the mouth of a burrow.

Pholcidae family of arachnids

Pholcidae, commonly known as cellar spiders, are a spider family in the suborder Araneomorphae. The family contains about 1500 species divided into about 80 genera.

<i>Cebrennus rechenbergi</i> species of arachnid

Cebrennus rechenbergi, also known as the Moroccan flic-flac spider and cartwheeling spider, is a species of huntsman spider indigenous to the sand dunes of the Erg Chebbi desert in Morocco. If provoked or threatened it can escape by doubling its normal walking speed using forward or backward flips similar to acrobatic flic-flac movements used by gymnasts. C. rechenbergi is the only spider known to use this unique form of rolling locomotion. The discovery of the Moroccan flic-flac spider has influenced biomimetic robot research, resulting in the development of an experimental robot based on the spider's motion.

Pinkfloydia is a genus of small long-jawed spiders containing a single described species, Pinkfloydia harveii, known from Western Australia. Individuals reach maximum lengths of 4.5 millimetres (0.18 in) and have a unique rounded, cone-shaped head structure with one pair of large eyes and 3 pairs of smaller eyes. The genus is named after British rock band Pink Floyd.

Aphonopelma hollyi, also known as the Lubbock gold tarantula, is considered by some sources to be a species of tarantula native to Texas in the United States. Described in 1995, the scientific name honors the 1950s rock-and-roll singer Buddy Holly. Other sources suggest spiders given this name are actually Aphonopelma hentzi.

Belippo anguina is an endemic jumping spider species that lives in São Tomé and Príncipe. It was first identified in 1910 by Simon from a juvenile specimen and is the type species for the genus Belippo. Its female holotype measures 4 mm.

Wesolowskana lymphatica is a species of jumping spiders of the family Salticidae. It is endemic in Cape Verde. The species was first described as Luxuria lymphatica by Wesołowska in 1989. It was renamed in 2008, because the genus Luxuria was already in use for a genus of molluscs.

Brachypelma fossorium is a species of spider in the family Theraphosidae (tarantulas), native to Costa Rica.

Aphantaulax ensifera is a species of ground spiders native to São Tomé and Príncipe. The species was named by Eugène Simon in 1907.

Baryphas eupogon is a species of jumping spiders native to São Tomé and Príncipe. The species was named by Eugène Simon in 1902.

Leiopterella is a genus of prehistoric eurypterid of the family Rhenopteridae. It contains one species, Leiopterella tetliei, from the Early Devonian of Nunavut, Canada. The name derives from the Greek leios and pteros. The species name honors Dr. O. Erik Tetlie for his contributions to the study of fossil eurypterids.

Loculla rauca is an endemic wolf spider species of the family Lycosidae that lives on São Tomé Island. It was first described in 1910 by Eugène Simon.

Maltecora janthina is an endemic jumping spider species of the family Salticidae that lives on São Tomé Island. It was first named in 1910 by Eugène Simon.

Palpimanus hesperius is a spider species of the family Palpimanidae that is endemic on São Tomé Island. It was first named in 1907 by Eugène Simon.

Pseudartonis semicoccinea is a spider species of the family Araneidae that is endemic on São Tomé Island. It was first named in 1907 by Eugène Simon.

Scelidocteus baccatus is a spider species of the family Palpimanidae that is endemic on São Tomé Island. It was first described in 1907 by Eugène Simon.

Echemus lacertosus is an endemic spider species of the family Gnaphosidae that lives on Príncipe in São Tomé and Príncipe. It was first described in 1907 by Eugène Simon.

Hogna thetis is an endemic spider species of the family Lycosidae that lives on Príncipe in São Tomé and Príncipe. It was first described as Lycosa thetis in 1907 by Eugène Simon.

Pochyta insulana is an endemic jumping spider species of the family Salticidae that lives on the island of Príncipe, São Tomé and Príncipe. It was first named and described in 1910 by Eugène Simon.

Pristobaeus vitiensis is a jumping spider species in the genus Pristobaeus. The female was first identified in 2008 by Barbara Maria Patoleta. The species was initially placed in the genus Palpelius but was renamed Pristobaeus vitiensis when Palpelius was accepted as the junior synonym for Pristobaeus.

References

  1. World Spider Catalog (2018). "Thoriosa spinivulva". Natural History Museum of Bern.
  2. Simon, E. (1910). "Arachnides recueillis par L. Fea sur la côte occidentale d'Afrique. 2e partie". Annali del Museo Civico di Storia Naturale di Genova. 44: 356–7.