Thorkell Farserk

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Thorkell Farserk, a shipmate and relative of Erik the Red, settled Hvalsey, Greenland, starting a farmstead there. [1] According to The Book of the Settlement of Iceland ( Landnámabók ), Farserk was very strong. He once swam to Hvalsey for an ox, bringing it back on his back to entertain Erik the Red. When he died, he was laid to rest in Hvalsey. [2]

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References

  1. "HVALSEY FJORD CHURCH". Wondermondo. November 19, 2015.
  2. The Book of the Settlement of Iceland. T. Wilson. 1898. p. 62.